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Werewolf of London (1935)

Passed | | Drama, Fantasy, Horror | 13 May 1935 (USA)
After botanist Wilfred Glendon travels to Tibet in search of a rare flower, the Mariphasa, he returns to a London haunted by murders that can only be the work of bloodthirsty werewolves.

Director:

Stuart Walker

Writers:

John Colton (screenplay), Robert Harris (story)
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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Henry Hull ... Dr. Wilfred Glendon
Warner Oland ... Dr. Yogami
Valerie Hobson ... Lisa Glendon
Lester Matthews ... Paul Ames
Lawrence Grant ... Sir Thomas Forsythe
Spring Byington ... Miss Ettie Coombes
Clark Williams ... Hugh Renwick
J.M. Kerrigan ... Hawkins
Charlotte Granville ... Lady Forsythe
Ethel Griffies ... Mrs. Whack
Zeffie Tilbury ... Mrs. Moncaster
Jeanne Bartlett Jeanne Bartlett ... Daisy
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Storyline

While on a botanical expedition in Tibet Dr. Wilfred Glendon is attacked in the dark by a strange animal. Returning to London, he finds himself turning nightly into a werewolf and terrorizing the city, with the only hope for curing his affliction a rare Asian flower, the Mariphasa. Written by Jeremy Lunt <durlinlunt@acadia.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Beware! Terror strikes in the night! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Horror

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

J.M. Kerrigan, who played Glendon's assistant Hawkins, also appeared in Universal's next werewolf film The Wolfman, in which he portrayed Evelyn Ankers' father. See more »

Goofs

When the werewolf is creeping thru the street, he has a cap on. When he enters Ettie Coombs room, the cap is missing. When he accosts to woman in the street after the visit to Ettie, the cap is back. See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Moncaster: Are you a single gentleman, sir?
Dr. Wilfred Glendon: Singularly single, madame. More single than I ever realized that it was possible for a human being to be.
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Crazy Credits

"A good cast is worth repeating..." See more »


Soundtracks

Symphonic Poem No. 3 From Preludes
(uncredited)
Music by Franz Liszt
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User Reviews

Draw Blood!
19 September 2001 | by Shield-3See all my reviews

Listen to the Warren Zevon jokes fly…

The secret to telling stories in any media, be it books, plays, TV or movies, is to make the audience care about the characters. The hero of `Werewolf of London,' Wilfred Glendon (Henry Hull), manages to earn our sympathy: he's a botanist obsessed with his studies to the point where he neglects his beautiful young wife Lisa (Valerie Hobson). His ordered life disintegrates when he is attacked by a werewolf in Tibet; he realizes he is doomed to the lycanthrope's savage curse at the same time his wife begins flirting with an old flame, Paul (Lester Matthews). The logical foundation of Glendon's life flies apart, and he came face-to-face with his brutal animal nature.

`Werewolf of London,' like most of the classic Universal horror pictures, is heavy on atmosphere, lots of shadows and fog. The transformation sequences and the makeup are good, although not as proficient as `The Wolf Man' six years later. The Werewolf of London struck me as a more sinister creature than the Wolf Man in his deliberateness. The Werewolf would even wear a sort of disguise as he stalked the streets of London, using his intelligence, whereas the Wolf Man was a more savage, animalistic force that attacked anyone nearby. It makes you wonder who would win a fight between the two…

And, as is usual for the old Universal horror films, the acting is very good. Henry Hull moves from stuffy academic to tortured soul, and brings us along for the ride (reminiscent of Basil Rathbone's deterioration in `Son of Frankenstein.') Valerie Hobson is luminous as always, and Warner Oland is quietly menacing as Dr. Yogami, who has an inside knowledge of `werewolfery.'

`Werewolf of London' will probably always be in the shadow of its successor, and rightfully so. There's nothing wrong with `Werewolf,' but there also isn't anything here that `Wolf Man' doesn't do better. It's just part of the horror evolution, a lesson well learned.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Cantonese | Latin

Release Date:

13 May 1935 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

WereWolf of London See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$195,393 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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