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Spring Tonic (1935)

Approved | | Comedy | 27 June 1935 (USA)
On the night before her wedding, Betty Ingals walks out of the rehearsal angry at her milquetoast fiance, Caleb Enix, because of his insistence on reasonableness and his lack of ardor. When... See full synopsis »

Director:

Clyde Bruckman

Writers:

Frank Griffin (comedy sequences), H.W. Hanemann (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Lew Ayres ... Caleb Enix
Claire Trevor ... Bertha 'Betty' Ingals
Walter Woolf King ... José
Jack Haley ... Sykes
Zasu Pitts ... Maggie Conklin
Tala Birell ... Lola
Sig Ruman ... Matt Conklin
Frank Mitchell ... Griffin Nasher
Jack Durant ... Cambridge Nasher
Herbert Mundin ... Thompson - the Butler
Henry Kolker ... Mr. Enix
Laura Treadwell Laura Treadwell ... Mrs. Enix
Douglas Wood ... Mr. Ingalls
Helen Freeman ... Mrs. Ingalls
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lynn Bari ... Bridesmaid
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Storyline

On the night before her wedding, Betty Ingals walks out of the rehearsal angry at her milquetoast fiance, Caleb Enix, because of his insistence on reasonableness and his lack of ardor. When he refuses to elope, Betty, with her clumsy, easily frightened maid Maggie in tow, sneaks into her car. Sykes, a snooping reporter, climbs onto their rumble seat as Betty heads upstate heedless of Maggie's warning that that part of the country is full of crazy people. As they near the Summit Lodge, Sykes is knocked into the bushes. Nearby, at the Melleh Bros. Wild Animal Circus, tiger trainer Lola rebukes her philandering husband Jose, who then opens the cage of Lola's tiger Mina so that Lola will be preoccupied while he pursues recreation. While searching for Mina, Lola comes across Giffen and Camebridge Nasher, two loony moonshiners, and promises to hire them as acrobats if they help find the tiger. Betty pays Matt, a partner of the Nashers in applejack production, ten dollars to stay in the ...

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Taglines:

It was a storm of love that blew through her heart and raised a gale of fun. (Print Ad- Daily Times, ((Rochester, Penna.)) 27 August 1935)

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Tonight There's a Spell on the Moon
(uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Jay Gorney
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User Reviews

Leaves no bitter taste!
28 March 2002 | by tashmanSee all my reviews

Clyde Bruckman did this one, and W.C. Fields' THE MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE in 1935. Fast moving, at times downright wacky, this zippy farce is almost too zippy and too much of a farce, but who cares? It never stops moving, which is SPRING TONIC's saving grace. The cast is engaging, and filled to the brim with some familiar (and welcome) names -- ZaSu Pitts, Walter Brennan, Lew Kelly, Sig Ruman, Henry Kolker, Arthur Housman, George Chandler, and Herbert Mundin among them. If you've been annoyed by the endless physical schtick of Mitchell & Durant, rest assured they are quite funny and well-utilized here. It is also fun to watch Walter Woolf King lampoon a guitar-serenading Latin "lover" type. Tala Birell is a riot as a subtle, dominatrix-style Lion Tamer, but the bulk of the action is centered around leading lady Claire Trevor, who alternates between a frantic frustration and a manic desire to keep the proceedings racing along. Different from other 1930s leads, Trevor's more like the later Anne Baxter -- a character actress strapping on her screwball heroine hat. Perhaps this is why SPRING TONIC is so entertaining, for no matter what is hurled her way (and everything is), Trevor never misses, and keeping the pace is that stalwart leading schlepp, Jack Haley, a consistently engaging spirit seen to advantage in this highly typical 1930s role, chock full o' his trademark cowardly heroics. Driving back in at about the midway point is leading man Lew Ayers, one of the more inconsistent film stars of that era, for in SPRING TONIC, he ain't so good, but he's not so bad, either. He shows up, he's accused of being stodgy, and he loosens up a bit. I've seen him handle similar assignments with much more verve and commitment (MURDER WITH PICTURES), but then again, I've also seen him far worse (IRON MAN). Ayers in no way hinders SPRING TONIC, but it really doesn't matter who was in it or how well they did, for most of the proceedings, and anything else not nailed firmly down to the rickety sets, was stolen from all by that American treasure, ZaSu Pitts. Suffice to say that there is one brief sequence that only involves Pitts and a small shelving unit - I've never seen anything quite so funny as that.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 June 1935 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Fox Film Corporation See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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