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Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)

Approved | | Comedy, Romance | 8 March 1935 (USA)
An English valet brought to the American west assimilates into the American way of life.

Director:

Leo McCarey

Writers:

Harry Leon Wilson (novel), Walter DeLeon (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 3 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charles Laughton ... Ruggles
Mary Boland ... Effie Floud
Charles Ruggles ... Egbert Floud (as Charlie Ruggles)
Zasu Pitts ... Prunella Judson (as ZaSu Pitts)
Roland Young ... George--Earl of Burnstead
Leila Hyams ... Nell Kenner
Maude Eburne ... 'Ma' Pettingill
Lucien Littlefield ... Charles Belknap-Jackson
Leota Lorraine ... Mrs. Belknap-Jackson
James Burke ... Jeff Tuttle
Dell Henderson ... Sam
Clarence Wilson ... Jake Henshaw
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Storyline

While visiting Paris in 1908, upper class Lord Burnstead loses his butler playing poker. Egbert and Effie Floud bring Ruggles back to Red Gap, Washington. Effie wants to take advantage of Ruggles' upper class background to influence Egbert's hick lifestyle. However, Egbert is more interested in partying and he takes Ruggles to the local 'beer bust'. When word gets out that "Colonel Ruggles is staying with his close friends" in the local paper, the butler becomes a town celebrity. After befriending Mrs. Judson, a widow who he impresses with his culinary skills, Ruggles decides to strike out on his own and open a restaurant. His transition from servant to independent man will depend on its success. Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

NOTHING BUT FUN FOR EVERYONE! print ad - Lubbock Morning Avalanche - Tech Theatre -Lubbock, Texas - September 22, 1944 - all caps) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original Broadway production of "Ruggles of Red Gap" by Harrison Rhodes opened at the Fulton Theater on December 25, 1915 and ran for 33 performances. See more »

Goofs

When Effie tells Ruggles to take her husband to the art museums she shows him a book that he uses to record his impressions of the art he's viewed, when the camera angle changes the book has changed from her hands to her husbands hands without any pause in her lines. See more »

Quotes

Lisette - French Maid: Burned, Madame?
Effie Floud: Taken out and burned. and then burn the ashes.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits are shown over various silhouettes of a butler. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Daffy Dilly (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

Cheyenne
(uncredited)
Music by Egbert Van Alstyne
Lyrics by Harry Williams
Sung by guests at Nell Kenner's place
See more »

User Reviews

 
Making Your Way In A New World
6 October 2006 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

Ruggles of Red Gap is the warm and tender story of Charles Laughton, gentlemen's gentlemen to Lord Roland Young who loses his services in a poker game to American western tourist Charlie Ruggles and his wife Mary Boland. Ruggles has some ideas about class distinction and one's proper place in society and he's in for quite a culture shock when he's brought back to the western town of Red Gap in Washington State.

In a way Ruggles of Red Gap is the polar opposite of The Earl of Chicago where an American gangster Robert Montgomery inherits an English title and experiences a reverse culture shock. In that film Montgomery has an English valet in Edmund Gwenn who indoctrinates him in reverse of what Laughton experiences. Of course things turn out a whole lot better for Marmaduke Ruggles than for the Earl of Kinmont.

In a way Ruggles of Red Gap may have been Charles Laughton's most personal film. In his life he became an American citizen because he preferred the American view of no titles of nobility and that one had better opportunities here than in Europe. It caused a certain amount of friction between Laughton and some other British players.

Laughton up to then had played a whole lot of bigger than life parts like Nero, Henry VIII, Captain Bligh, Edward Moulton Barrett, parts that called for a lot of swagger. Marmaduke Ruggles is a different kind of man. Self contained, shy, and unsure of himself in new surroundings. But Laughton pulls it off beautifully. It's almost Quasimodo without the grotesque make up. Also very much like the school teacher in This Land is Mine.

Charlie Ruggles and Mary Boland never fail to entertain, they worked beautifully together in a number of films in the early Thirties. They always were a married couple, Boland a very haughty woman with some exaggerated ideas of her own importance and her ever patient and somewhat henpecked husband Charlie. In Ruggles of Red Gap, Charlie Ruggles is a little less henpecked.

My guess is that Zasu Pitts played the role she did because Elsa Lanchester might have been busy elsewhere. I believe she was making the Bride of Frankenstein around this time. Pitts's scenes with Laughton resonate the same way as some of Charles Laughton's best work with his wife.

The highlight of Ruggles of Red Gap has always been Laughton's recital of The Gettysburg Address. In a scene in a saloon where none of the American born people can remember anything of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Laughton the immigrant recited it from memory. It was a harbinger of some of Laughton's later recitals which I remember as a kid on the Ed Sullivan show. The scene is a tribute to all the immigrants who come here because of the ideals this country is supposed to represent. Sometimes our immigrants have taken it more seriously than those who were born here. Immigrants like Charles Laughton.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

8 March 1935 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Ruggles of Red Gap See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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