5.6/10
63
4 user

The Lady in Red (1935)

A parrot invades a cockroach nightclub and kidnaps its star dancer.

Director:

Friz Freleng (as Isadore Freleng)
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Storyline

A Mexican Cafe after hours is the setting for a cockroach party a la Joe's Apartment (1996), where the eponymous star of the show is a hot, six-legged senorita in a red dress. An interloping parrot chashes the party, apparently determined to have the guest of honor as a snack. But the audience is not about to give up the object of their collective affection so easily, and one heroic bug manages to torch the parrot's tail and rescue the damsel in distress, which is, of course, a good excuse to continue the fiesta on into the night. Freling did partial remake of this cartoon the following year with flies and a spider standing in for the roaches and parrot in Bingo Crosbyana (1936). Written by runar-4

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 September 1935 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

[first lines]
Tennis Player: Ready?
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Connections

Edited into Toy Town Hall (1936) See more »

Soundtracks

The Lady in Red
(uncredited)
Music by Allie Wrubel
Lyrics by Mort Dixon
Played at the beginning and often in the score
Sung by the Mexican vocal group
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User Reviews

 
La Cucaracha dances
31 July 2007 | by lee_eisenbergSee all my reviews

True, Friz Freleng's early cartoon "The Lady in Red" stereotypes Mexico a little bit, but it's got some cool scenes, as a bevy of cockroaches party in a café after hours. The title woman performs a sultry dance. But then a parrot sees the action and gets hungry. That's instinct, I guess.

As this came out in the early days of Warner Bros. animation, there's none of the full scale wackiness that became their cornerstone throughout the '40s and '50s. As it was, I notice that a lot of their cartoons in 1935 and 1936 took their titles from songs: "I Haven't Got a Hat" (mostly famous as Porky Pig's debut), "I Love to Singa" and "Let It Be Me".

Anyway, an OK cartoon. Available on YouTube.


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