James Cagney helped jump-start the gangster genre as The Public Enemy. Outcries against movies that glorified underworld criminals put Cagneyon the side of the law in "G" Men.

Director:

William Keighley

Writers:

Seton I. Miller (story), Seton I. Miller (screenplay)
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
James Cagney ... 'Brick' Davis
Margaret Lindsay ... Kay McCord
Ann Dvorak ... Jean Morgan
Robert Armstrong ... Jeff McCord
Barton MacLane ... Collins
Lloyd Nolan ... Hugh Farrell
William Harrigan ... 'Mac' McKay
Russell Hopton ... Gerard
Edward Pawley ... Danny Leggett
Noel Madison ... Durfee
Monte Blue ... Fingerprint Expert
Regis Toomey ... Eddie Buchanan
Addison Richards ... Bruce J. Gregory
Harold Huber ... Venke
Raymond Hatton ... Gangsters' Messenger with Warning
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Storyline

It's the early days of the F.B.I. - federal agents working for the Department of Justice. Though they've got limited powers - they don't carry weapons and have to get local police approval for arrests - that doesn't stop fresh Law School grad Eddie Buchanan from joining up, and he encourages his former roommate James "Brick" Davis (James Cagney) to do so as well. But Davis wants to be an honest lawyer, not a shyster, despite his ties to mobster boss McKay, and he's intent on doing so, until Buchanan is gunned down trying to arrest career criminal Danny Leggett. Davis soon joins the "G-Men" as they hunt down Leggett (soon-to-be Public Enemy Number One) and his cronies Collins and Durfee, who are engaged in a crime and murder spree from New York to the midwest. Written by Gary Dickerson <slug@mail.utexas.edu>

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Taglines:

Hollywood's Most Famous Bad Man Joins the "G-MEN" and Halts the March of Crime! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Warner Brothers re-released 'G' MEN to theaters in 1948, a new opening scene was added to explain that the 1935 movie did not reflect the FBI of the late 1940s. David Brian plays an FBI official addressing a group of new agent-recruits (among them Douglas Kennedy), for whom the old movie will be a history lesson. TCM's print of 'G' MEN includes this scene. See more »

Goofs

A crashing automobile knocks over a street lamp just before it runs into a building. The lamp falls away from the camera so that its bottom is exposed. Clearly the lamp is a prop with no electrical wiring. See more »

Quotes

James 'Brick' Davis: You haven't had an attack of brilliance lately. Why don't you try guessing?
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Alternate Versions

For the movie's 1949 re-release, a new scene was shot and stuck on at the beginning of the movie. That scene is still in the pic every time it's shown on TV, it's on the home video release, etc. In this added-14-years-later pre- credits sequence, David Brian plays The Chief and Douglas Kennedy (I) plays An Agent. See more »

Connections

Referenced in I due vigili (1967) See more »

Soundtracks

Go Into Your Dance
(1935) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Danced by the dance troupe at the nightclub
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User Reviews

 
One of Cagney's best
7 June 2004 | by MartynGryphonSee all my reviews

I could go on record as saying that G-men is probably my favourite film of all time, but I won't. Though it would certainly have no need to fight for a place in my top 5, as anyone who's seen this movie could see why it would have a well earned place there.

Cagney plays the tough guy again, but this time firmly on the side of Uncle Sam, as a laywer turned Federal Agent to avenge the death of a friend. Cagneys performance is one of his best, and it's not just cagney that shines, Robert Armstrong is brilliant as Cagney's tough talking FBI boss. and Regis Toomey's good but brief appearance as Cagney's doomed friend is equally pleasing.

I love everything about this Movie, the guns, the Cars, the suits, the music. The only thing I don't like, is that every version you find of this great film these days has the annoying and rather pointless prologue added in 1949, showing a group of 'FBI Men' (or actors as I like to call them) having a training session where the instructor tells this fledgling officers that Gangsters are scum and and that law and order will prevail. WHY????????

The 1930's were Warner Bros's glory days, and their gangster films were rightly regarded as the best crime movies ever (until supplanted by the brilliant Godfather movies). However, the new makes way for the old, and Pacino, De Niro, Brando, as good as they are, could NEVER replace the cockiness of Cagney, the ruthlessness of Raft,and the barbarity of Bogie(though sadly neither Bogart or Raft appear in this picture I'm afraid). Maybe that's where the film could have been better with Barton McClanes lacklustre performance as Cagney's gangster nemesis, being replaced by either George Raft or Humphrey Bogart. I'm not going to spoil the plot, as this movies a treat for all fans of B&W gangster films. this is a MUST SEE


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 May 1935 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

G-Men See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$450,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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