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A Dog of Flanders (1935)

Approved | | Drama | 22 March 1935 (USA)
Tentative adaptation of Ouida's sentimental classic about a poor Flemish boy (Frankie Thomas) whose ambition is to become a painter.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Herr Vanderkloot
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Frau Vanderkloot
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Sacristan
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Storyline

Tentative adaptation of Ouida's sentimental classic about a poor Flemish boy (Frankie Thomas) whose ambition is to become a painter.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 March 1935 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El perro de Flandes  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A contemporary news item listed Henry Kolker in the cast, but he never appeared. See more »

Quotes

Frau Ilse Cogez: [Herr Cogez is upset that his daughter is associating with lower class people] What is it Carl?
Carl Cogez: Again our Maria is off with that shabby boy, Nello.
Frau Ilse Cogez: Well, Carl, what harm can come of it? They're just two children. They...
Carl Cogez: Enough, Ilse. You are a woman, and therefore a fool.
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Connections

Referenced in Patrasche: A Dog of Flanders, Made in Japan (2007) See more »

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User Reviews

 
And Dream of More
12 March 2010 | by See all my reviews

The acting in this version of Ouida's sentimental story of a poor young boy who wants to be an artist definitely has its issues in terms of speaking lines; even O.P. Heggie, usually a very reliable talent, is poorly modulated. This I lay solely at the feet of the director, Edward Sloman, who had been directing for twenty years.

However, even though a dialog director might have aided some of the performances, the visuals in this are outstanding -- a hallmark of Sloman's work and veteran cinematographer J. Roy Hunt. The voice direction may be poor, but the physical acting is just fine. Given the story -- and the dialog -- references to Rubens, it should come as no surprise that the images refer to the artist, and make the point of the story thereby: that beauty is everywhere for those who can see it, and that faith hope and charity will be rewarded.

This may seem a naive sentiment in this day and age, but when was there a day and age where these virtues were not threatened? Surely a simple story is the place to begin to tell a simple tale.


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