Crime and Punishment (1935) - News Poster

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Daily | Previewing Viennale 2016

The Viennale, running this year from October 20 through November 2, has begun previewing its lineup, including a retrospective essentially built on creatively programmed double features. For example: F.W. Murnau's Faust and William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster; three versions of Wuthering Heights (William Wyler, Luis Buñuel and Jacques Rivette); Alan Clarke's Elephant (1989) and Gus Van Sant's Elephant (2003); Josef von Sternberg's Crime and Punishment and Lav Diaz's Norte, the End of History; and so on. There'll also be special programs dedicated to Christopher Walken and Peter Hutton and among the features in the main program are Mia Hansen-Løve's Things to Come, Tim Sutton's Dark Night and Paul Verhoeven's Elle. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Previewing Viennale 2016

The Viennale, running this year from October 20 through November 2, has begun previewing its lineup, including a retrospective essentially built on creatively programmed double features. For example: F.W. Murnau's Faust and William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster; three versions of Wuthering Heights (William Wyler, Luis Buñuel and Jacques Rivette); Alan Clarke's Elephant (1989) and Gus Van Sant's Elephant (2003); Josef von Sternberg's Crime and Punishment and Lav Diaz's Norte, the End of History; and so on. There'll also be special programs dedicated to Christopher Walken and Peter Hutton and among the features in the main program are Mia Hansen-Løve's Things to Come, Tim Sutton's Dark Night and Paul Verhoeven's Elle. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

NYC Weekend Watch: Bresson, Akerman, Maddin, Peckinpah, ‘Cannibal Holocaust’ & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

“Welcome to Metrograph: A-z” brings George A. Romero‘s greatest zombie picture, Day of the Dead, on Friday. Saturday includes Abbas Kiarostami‘s Close-Up, Robert Bresson‘s The Devil, Probably (also playing on Sunday), and Coming Apart; Sunday, see the Maggie Cheung-led Comrades: Almost a Love Story.

“Three Wiseman” offers two Wisemans: High School and Titicut Follies.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Metrograph, New York City’s Newest Indie Theater, Unveils Impressive First Slate of Programming

Each weekend we highlight the best repertory programming that New York City has to offer, and it’s about to get even better. Opening on February 19th at 7 Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side is Metrograph, the city’s newest indie movie theater. Sporting two screens, they’ve announced their first slate, which includes retrospectives for Fassbinder, Wiseman, Eustache, and more, special programs such as an ode to the moviegoing experience, and new independent features that we’ve admired on the festival circuit (including Afternoon, Office 3D, and Measure of a Man).

Artistic and Programming Director Jacob Perlin says in a press release, “Jean Eustache in a Rocky t-shirt. This is the image we had in mind while making this first calendar. Great cinema is there, wherever you can find it. The dismissed film now recognized as a classic, the forgotten box-office hit newly resurrected, the high and the low,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Josef von Sternberg on TCM: Morocco, MacAo, The Shanghai Gesture

Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Morocco Turner Classic Movies is dedicating this evening to filmmaker Josef von Sternberg, best known for his elaborate pageants starring Marlene Dietrich. One of those, Shanghai Express (1932) was shown earlier this evening; another, the creaky melodrama Morocco (1930), which earned Dietrich her sole Academy Award nomination, is on right now. Gary Cooper and Adolphe Menjou co-star. Next, TCM will present Crime and Punishment (1935) an atmospheric but melodramatic adaptation of Dostoevsky's novel. I've yet to sit through the last three: The Shanghai Gesture (1941), Macao (1952), and The King Steps Out (1937). Schedule and synopses from the TCM website: 5:00pm [Romance] Shanghai Express (1932) A beautiful temptress re-kindles an old romance while trying to escape her past during a tension-packed train journey. Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong, Warner Oland Dir: Josef von Sternberg Bw-82 mins 6:30pm [Romance] Morocco (1930) A sultry cabaret singer falls [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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