Mary Shelley reveals the main characters of her novel survived: Dr. Frankenstein, goaded by an even madder scientist, builds his monster a mate.

Director:

James Whale

Writers:

Mary Shelley (suggested by: the original story written in 1816 by) (as Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley), William Hurlbut (adapted by) | 2 more credits »
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Boris Karloff ... The Monster (as Karloff)
Colin Clive ... Henry Frankenstein
Valerie Hobson ... Elizabeth
Ernest Thesiger ... Doctor Pretorius
Elsa Lanchester ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley / The Monster's Mate
Gavin Gordon ... Lord Byron
Douglas Walton ... Percy Bysshe Shelley
Una O'Connor ... Minnie
E.E. Clive ... Burgomaster
Lucien Prival ... Butler
O.P. Heggie ... Hermit
Dwight Frye ... Karl
Reginald Barlow ... Hans
Mary Gordon ... Hans' Wife
Anne Darling ... Shepherdess (as Ann Darling)
Edit

Storyline

Dr. Frankenstein and his monster both turn out to be alive, not killed as previously believed. Dr. Frankenstein wants to get out of the evil experiment business, but when a mad scientist, Dr. Pretorius, kidnaps his wife, Dr. Frankenstein agrees to help him create a new creature, a woman, to be the companion of the monster. Written by John Oswalt <jao@jao.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Monster Thriller See more »

Genres:

Drama | Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

2007: The movie's line "We belong dead" was voted as the #63 of "The 100 Greatest Movie Lines" by Premiere magazine. See more »

Goofs

As the blind man prays over the monster, he clutches the monster's hand in his own and holds it to his heart. In the wide shots, the tangle of hands is near the top of the man's chest, right under his chin. In the close-ups of the man praying, there are no hands visible. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[prologue]
[Lord Byron looking out the window at a thunderstorm]
Lord Byron: How beautifully dramatic! The cruelest savage exhibition of nature at her worst without.
[turns to face Mary and Percy Shelley, both seated]
Lord Byron: And we three. We elegant three within. I should like to think that an irate Jehovah was pointing those arrows of lightning directly at my head. The unbowed head of George Gordon, Lord Byron. England's greatest sinner. But I cannot flatter myself to that extent. Possibly those ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the opening and closing credits, "The Monster's Mate" is listed as being played by " ? " . Elsa Lanchester is only billed as playing Mary Shelley. See more »

Alternate Versions

Also available in a colorized version See more »

Connections

Spoofed in The Ben Stiller Show: With Garry Shandling (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Ave Maria (Op.52 No.1)
(1825) (uncredited)
Written by Franz Schubert
Played on violin by O.P. Heggie (dubbed). Also played in the score
See more »

User Reviews

 
Lightning strikes twice.
16 September 2014 | by Sergeant_TibbsSee all my reviews

The sequel to the iconic horror classic Frankenstein is an oddball one. That's part of its charm. The Bride of Frankenstein sounds like a piece of parody rather than a sincere followup, and in a way it's awareness of its sometimes satirical nature makes it stronger than its straighter predecessor. However, its finest facets are its ahead-of-its-time technical aspects. The stark cinematography is astonishing and the precision of its sharp editing is unprecedented, let alone the reliably impressive production design. It's a much more entertaining and enduring experience than other films of the 30s. James Whale got much better conviction out of his actors this time around and it deals with the moral consequences of their actions rather than leaving it to loud anguish. While the film is a bit of retread of the first film as Frankenstein's monster is chased from place to place, it adds development and essential sensitivity to his character leading its tragic end to be much more meaningful in its destruction. This was a very pleasant surprise, ominously horrific and slyly comic, without the two clashing.

8/10


11 of 12 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 301 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 May 1935 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Bride of Frankenstein See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$397,024 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$10,493
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Noiseless Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed