5.9/10
452
20 user 7 critic

Smarty (1934)

Passed | | Comedy, Romance | 19 May 1934 (USA)
Vicki Wallace (Joan Blondell) takes great pleasure in teasing her husband,Tony Wallace (Warren William), who takes no pleasure at all in being teased and it isn't long before he ups and ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert Florey

Writers:

F. Hugh Herbert (screen play), Carl Erickson (screen play) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Joan Blondell ... Vicki Wallace / Thorpe
Warren William ... Tony Wallace
Edward Everett Horton ... Vernon Thorpe
Frank McHugh ... George Lancaster
Claire Dodd ... Anita
Joan Wheeler Joan Wheeler ... Mrs. Bonnie Durham
Virginia Sale ... Edna - Vicki's Maid
Leonard Carey ... Tilford - Tony's Butler
Edit

Storyline

Vicki Wallace (Joan Blondell) takes great pleasure in teasing her husband,Tony Wallace (Warren William), who takes no pleasure at all in being teased and it isn't long before he ups and clips her on the chin. Vicki's friend and attorney, Vernon Thorpe (Edward Everett Horton), secures a divorce for her, and Vicki and Vernon are soon married. Vicki's yen for wearing revealing clothes and a penchant for inviting ex-husband Tony to dinner soon provokes the easily-provoked Vernon into belting one on her himself. She goes to Tony's apartment, where Tony is entertaining Bonnie (Joan Wheeler), who is not all that entertained by the presence of Vicki, especially after Vicki shows every intent of moving in and staying. Vernon shows up with George (Frank McHugh) and Anita (Claire Dood), evidently along so F. Hugh Herbert's lines can be spread among five players instead of three, and Vicki more or less tells Vernon that as long as she is going to be slugged by a husband, she will just go back to ... Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Get Giggly while peppy Joan decides which of two husbands to keep! (Print Ad- Pittsburgh Post-Gazette,((Pittsburgh, Penna.)) 2 August 1934) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The play opened first in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA on 1 October 1927. It was retitled "Funny Face" for its New York run off-Broadway beginning 22 November 1927. See more »

Goofs

When Tony is in his apartment serving drinks to Bonnie and himself, he is holding his glass with his right hand as he sits down. But on the next immediate cut when he sits down, he is now holding the glass with his left hand. See more »

Quotes

Anita 'Nita': I don't mind strange beds at all.
Tony: If I'm not mistaken, it's a preference - that led to your recent divorce.
Anita 'Nita': Yes, darling. And now it's going to lead to yours.
See more »

Connections

References The Public Enemy (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

Bridal Chorus
(1850) (uncredited)
from "Lohengrin"
aka "Here Comes the Bride"
Music by Richard Wagner
Performed by the Vitaphone Orchestra
Variation played when marriage is announced in gossip column
See more »

User Reviews

 
Joan Blondell Dishes Out The Diced Carrots
4 September 2002 | by Ron OliverSee all my reviews

A bored & beautiful SMARTY enjoys goading both of her husbands into fits of jealous rage.

This very bizarre little comedy from Warner Bros., which sneaked in under the wire before the imposition of the Production Code, actually espouses physical abuse as the secret ingredient needed in keeping the romantic spark alive in marriage. This distressful assertion is promoted by skillful players and smug dialogue, but to no avail.

Joan Blondell, as blonde & curvaceous as ever, is portrayed as an intensely annoying young virago with all the charm of an acid bath. Endlessly nagging, the script gives her one shrill note to play, which she does with unnerving tenacity. In most of her other roles of the period she played a smart & sassy gal who has to fight her way to happiness by final fadeout. Here, Blondell starts with everything and seems determined to claw her way to the bottom again. Must be some sort of mental aberration.

Patrician Warren William & nervous Edward Everett Horton supplied wonderful moments in dozens of Golden Age films. Here, as the two men caught in Blondell's web, although they make valiant efforts, they seem out of place in the rather sordid storyline.

Rounding out the cast as two friends seemingly without meaningful lives of their own, viewers will probably find Frank McHugh to be distressingly simpleminded and pretty Claire Dodd vindictive & catty. Neither exemplify the sort of friend one would want to have during a time of domestic crisis.

Perhaps it would be well to quote a single paragraph from celebrated journalist Harriet Hubbard Ayer's essay `What Not To Do,' published in CORRECT SOCIAL USAGE (The New York Society Of Self-Culture, 1903) `Don't nag; there's nothing in it but hateful thoughts for all concerned, and such thoughts are germs that breed deceit on one side and ungovernable temper on the other. At the end of the road is division of hearts, often a divorce court.' Blondell & Company should have paid heed.


25 of 36 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 20 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 May 1934 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Hit Me Again See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed