Of Human Bondage (1934) - News Poster

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11 days til Oscar - Is Bette Davis a 10 or an 11?

The closeup changes everything. In 1934, Bette Davis became a Star.

A very random question for you Oscar fanatics out there. Do you count Bette Davis as having 10 or 11 nominations? In other words, do you count her write-in nomination for Of Human Bondage (1934), her breakout star-making role which obviously led to her first win for the lesser performance in Dangerous (1935) the very next year, as one of her nods or do you go by the Academy's 'Of Human Bondage is not an official nomination' stance even though it's such an intrinsic part of Oscar lore of the 1930s?
See full article at FilmExperience »

La vérité

Brigitte Bardot proved her mettle as a dramatic actress in H.G. Clouzot’s strikingly pro-feminist courtroom epic, that puts the modern age of ‘immoral’ permissiveness on trial. Is Bardot’s selfish, sensation-seeking young lover an oppressed victim? Clouzot makes her the author of her own problems yet doesn’t let her patriarchal inquisitors off the hook.

La vérité

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 960

1960 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 128 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 12, 2019 / 39.95

Starring: Brigitte Bardot, Paul Meurisse, Charles Vanel, Sami Frey, Marie-JoséNat, Jean-Loup Reynold, André Oumansky, Claude Berri, Jacques Perrin, Jacques Marin. Fernand Ledoux.

Cinematography: Armand Thirard

Film Editor: Albert Jurgenson

Written by Henri-Georges Clouzot, Simone Drieu, Michèle Perrein, Jérôme Géronimi, Christiane Rochefort, Véra Clouzot

Produced by Raoul Lévy

Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot

H.G. Clouzot mesmerized audiences with the political outrage of The Wages of Fear and the riveting horror-suspense of Diabolique, but his intellectual,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

2018 Oscars: All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?

2018 Oscars:  All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”), Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water”), Meryl Streep (“The Post”) and Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) have long been our predicted Best Actress Oscar nominees. If they all make the cut, along with their films in Best Picture, they’d join a very exclusive club: It’d be first Best Actress slate in 40 years and just the fifth overall where everyone is in a film nominated for Best Picture.

The only other times this has occurred were for the film years 1934, 1939, 1940 and 1977 — but many of them come with caveats. In 1934, there were still only three acting nominees — winner Claudette Colbert (“It Happened One Night”), Grace Moore (“One Night of Love”) and Norma Shearer (“The Barretts of Wimpole Street”) — and 12 Best Picture nominees, before the academy standardized the categories to five each. This was also the infamous year of the write-in
See full article at Gold Derby »

On This Day: Basquiat, Last Temptation, Cleopatra

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz

30 BC Cleopatra commits suicide, allegedly by purposeful snake bite. I don't remember that scene in Liz Taylor's Cleopatra but it might have been at the four hour mark and t'was possibly asleep

How to honor this day: play with someone's snake. In the absence of a suitable one, wink at someone as saucily as Liz

← 1915 "Of Human Bondage" by W Somerset Maugham published. 19 years later it becomes a movie and marks Bette Davis's ascent to superstar actress

How to honor this day: Let it all out like Bette in that performance that's pure
See full article at FilmExperience »

So Is Zendaya Playing Mary Jane in Spider-Man: Homecoming or What?

In Sam Raimi's early 2000s Spider-Man franchise, Kirsten Dunst appears as the bubbly, popular, redheaded Mary Jane Watson, one of Peter Parker's most iconic love interests. With a new version of the teenage web-slinger's story on the way in the form of Sony and Marvel's Spider-Man: Homecoming, fans have been trying to determine if Zendaya, whose casting as "Michelle" was announced to much fanfare, is the next person to step into Mj's shoes. Shortly after The Wrap confirmed that Zendaya's role was indeed Mary Jane last Summer, we went on a visit to Spider-Man: Homecoming's Atlanta set, where we assumed we'd get a straight answer about the true nature of her role. The short version? We're still not totally sure who she's playing. The long version? Well, keep reading. RelatedEverything You Need to Know About Spider-Man: Homecoming While speaking with Eric Carroll, coproducer and director of development for Marvel, he insisted that "Zendaya is playing a character named Michelle. And I promise you, when the movie comes out, that her name is Michelle." As you can see in the film's first trailer, Michelle could not look more different than Dunst's take on the character. She's in head-to-toe black, wearing little to no makeup, has a messy ponytail, is reading Of Human Bondage in their gym class, and seems to be a lone wolf. Oh, and she also isn't afraid to dish out insults to Peter and Ned (Jacob Batalon) while they ogle Peter's crush, Liz Allan (Laura Harrier). It would certainly be a new direction for the character (if she's truly Mj, of course), but a welcome one. "I always thought of her as being a version of Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club, what Linda Cardellini is like in Freaks and Geeks," director Jon Watts told us about Michelle. "It's just a cool character, and it's cool for her to be that character I thought. She has a really cool wardrobe, really funny, lots of literary nods." Tom Holland, who plays Peter Parker, also had some interesting things to say about his costar. "Michelle is a very interesting character. She's very quiet. She's always reading these crazy books, like 'How to Murder Someone Without Anyone Knowing,'" he joked. "We'll be doing a scene with all the other cast members, and she'll suddenly just pitch in and all of us stop, like, 'That was a strange thing to say.' And then we continue on with our dialogue. . . . Z has really brought a lot of herself to the character." If we take the cast and production team at their word and the K.C. Undercover star's character really is named Michelle, it still doesn't necessarily put her out of the running of being Mj. One of the biggest things that Carroll emphasized during our conversation was that Spider-Man: Homecoming is attempting to do something completely fresh and new, specifically that the goal "was not to see what's already been seen." With two Spider-Man franchises already in the can, the new film will require a bit of reinvention to be original. Maybe Mj's new name (Michelle J. Watson? Michelle-Jane Watson, only the "Jane" is silent?) and new personality are a part of that. Further adding to our suspicion that Michelle is Mj is the extremely cagey way everyone on set spoke about her character. A simple "Zendaya isn't playing Mary Jane" would have nipped the whole question in the bud. Instead, there was a lot of dancing around the subject. After being asked about the racism Zendaya has experienced after internet trolls and fan boys decided Mary Jane could only ever be played by a white woman, Holland said that she's taking it all in stride. The comment would not typically be surprising (Zendaya is Twitter's reigning queen of clapbacks, after all), except for the way he describes her character. "She has such a large following on Instagram, and the majority of those people are all for her and all love her," he said. "I feel like our generation of people are all moving on past this whole 'you can't cast someone who's not the set right race for a character.' I think we're breaking through and changing that, and Z is perfect for it. Z is so powerful and strong-willed, it's not going to shake her at all." As Bustle notes in its own dissection of the quote, why would Holland even bother discussing the Mary Jane haters going after her if she's not actually playing the character? Sony producer Amy Pascal was similarly evasive when questions came up about Michelle, noting that "Peter has lots of girls around him in this movie" and that "the story is about him and Liz." Watts would only acknowledge the existence of multiple Michelles in the comics but didn't want to further address any of the "weird rumors flying around." Before Spidey swings into theaters on July 6, all we'll know for sure is that Zendaya's Michelle is going to play a huge part in Peter's life. She might not be Mary Jane, but that doesn't rule out an eventual nickname of "Mj," right? If we don't get a definitive answer to the mystery in Homecoming, here's hoping a juicy postcredits scene makes things a little clearer, at the very least.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

TCM Remembers Lovely and Talented Brunette of Studio Era

Frances Dee movies: From 'An American Tragedy' to 'Four Faces West' Frances Dee began her film career at the dawn of the sound era, going from extra to leading lady within a matter of months. Her rapid ascencion came about thanks to Maurice Chevalier, who got her as his romantic interested in Ludwig Berger's 1930 romantic comedy Playboy of Paris. Despite her dark(-haired) good looks and pleasant personality, Dee's Hollywood career never quite progressed to major – or even moderate – stardom. But she was to remain a busy leading lady for about 15 years. Tonight, Turner Classic Movies is showing seven Frances Dee films, ranging from heavy dramas to Westerns. Unfortunately missing is one of Dee's most curious efforts, the raunchy pre-Coder Blood Money, which possibly features her most unusual – and most effective – performance. Having said that, William A. Wellman's Love Is a Racket is a worthwhile subsitute, though the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

On this day: Jungle Book's First, Dolly's Near Last, and Annie Hall vs. Star Wars

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

1882  The titular event in The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007) happened on this very day in Missouri

1893 Leading man of the 1930s Leslie Howard (Gone With the Wind, Of Human Bondage) born in London

1921 Jan Sterling born in NYC. (We recently discussed her Oscar nominated performance in The High and the Mighty )

1922 After years of "which year is it?" it's finally settled... Doris Day was born on this day 1922. So happy 95th birthday to the icon, still with us, today. 

1924 Another cinematic icon, Marlon Brando, born in Omaha
See full article at FilmExperience »

Today in History: Page's Second Globe, Larry & Viv's Affair, Etc...

Looking for something to celebrate today? On this day in history as it relates to showbiz...

1874 Oscar nominee Henry Travers (Mrs Miniver) was born in England

1908 Future Oscar winner, "Henry Higgins" and "Dr Dolittle" himself Sir Rex Harrison is born 

1922 Fw Murnau's silent classic Nosferatu premieres in its home country of Germany. On the same day in Italy the future super controversial auteur Pier Paolo Pasolini (120 Days of Sodom, The Gospel According to St Matthew) is born

1936 Dean Stockwell is born in California. He will go on to have an epically lengthy career starting as a child star in the 40s and still working occasionally today. On the same day the '35 Oscars were held with Mutiny on the Bounty taking Best Picture and Bette Davis winning her first Oscar for Dangerous. Oscar was already doing "sorry about last time" awards as that one was obviously for her far superior work in Of Human Bondage.
See full article at FilmExperience »

On This Day in History: 1988 & 1994's Opposing Best Pic Lineups!

Feeling festive today but not quite ready for Christmas? Celebrate one of these anniversaries!

1805 Joseph Smith Jr, founder of the Mormon Church is born in Vermont. Here's a very random piece of trivia: Outside of the very early movie Brigham Young (1940) about his successor with Vincent Price in the Joseph Smith role, the only actually famous actor to ever play him is Dean Cain of Lois & Clark fame in a movie called September Dawn (2007)? It's kind of hard to draw a line connecting Vincent Price and Dean Cain otherwise, right?

1867 Madame Cj Walker, cosmetics mogul and the first black female millionaire in America, is born in Louisiana. Where's her biopic, Hollywood? History has more than just Great White Man stories.

1887 Underappreciated director John Cromwell who guided Bette Davis's breakthrough role in Of Human Bondage , and the all female wonders of Caged was born in Ohio. One more Bette related anniversary after the jump.
See full article at FilmExperience »

10 of the best Oscars snubs

Ahead of this year’s Academy Awards ceremony, we look at the most infamous Oscars oversights

Davis’s vicious performance in the pre-code adaptation of W Somerset Maugham’s Of Human Bondage was critically hailed as a landmark – yet Warner Bros studio politics (she broke contract to make the picture) cost her a best actress nomination. The outcry prompted a (since-revoked) rule change: voters could overrule the nominees by writing in an alternative on the ballot paper. Davis’s “write in” hype actually saw her enter the ceremony as the favourite, though she lost to the official nominee, Claudette Colbert, for It Happened One Night; later, voting tallies revealed Davis only placed third. She won the next year for negligible work in the hoary melodrama Dangerous – a transparent makeup award if ever there was one.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

11 Days Until Oscar! Trivia Party

I'm beginning to have butterflies. You? Just for fun some random trivia surrounding the number 11 today. Links go to previous articles here at Tfe on these films or performers

• Pictures with exactly 11 Oscar nominations

Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Rebecca (1940), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), Sunset Blvd (1950), West Side Story (1961), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Godfather Pt II (1974), Chinatown (1974), The Turning Point (1977), Gandhi (1982), Terms of Endearment (1983), Amadeus (1984), A Passage to India (1984), Out of Africa (1985), The Color Purple (1985), Saving Private Ryan (1998), Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), The Aviator (2004), Hugo (2011), and Life of Pi (2012)

• Movies that won exactly 11 Oscars

That's the most any movie has ever won and it's a three way tie: Ben-Hur (1959), Titanic (1997), The Lord of the Ring: Return of the King (2003). Currently Ben-Hur is being remade and is supposedly opening this very summer... wish them good luck because living up to such a
See full article at FilmExperience »

Best Actress Academy Award Winner Crawford Shines as Businesswoman/Mom with Evil Daughter

Joan Crawford in 'Mildred Pierce.' 'Mildred Pierce' review: Very entertaining soap opera Time has a way of making some films seem grander than they really are. A good example is Mildred Pierce, the 1945 black-and-white melodrama directed by Casablanca's Michael Curtiz, and that won star Joan Crawford a Best Actress Oscar. Mildred Pierce is in no way, shape, or form great art, even though it's certainly not a bad film. In fact, as a soap opera it's quite entertaining – no, make that very entertaining; and entertainment is a quality that can stand on its own. (The problem in recent decades is that cinema has become nothing but entertainment.) In the case of Mildred Pierce, the entertainment is formulaic and rather predictable – but in an enjoyable, campy sort of way. Unbridled Hollywood melodrama Now, what makes Mildred Pierce a melodrama is something known as the Dumbest Possible Action – Dpa for short.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

What’s New on Hulu: November 2015

  • Vulture
What’s New on Hulu: November 2015
At the beginning of (and throughout) every month, Hulu adds new movies and TV shows to its catalogue. Here is a quick list of several that you might be interested in. Some of these may also have previously been on Hulu, only to have been removed and then added back. Feel free to note anything we've left out in the comments below.Of human bondage:Diamonds Are Forever (1971), For Your Eyes Only (1981), From Russia With Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964), License to Kill (1989), Live and Let Die (1973), The Living Daylights (1987), Man With The Golden Gun (1974), Moonraker (1979), Never Say Never Again (1983), Octopussy (1983), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), Thunderball (1965), A View to a Kill (1985) Like a demonic supervillain, Hulu has acquired a gigantic catalogue of Bond movies in time for the release of Spectre on November 6. “Do you expect me to stream all of these before then?” you ask.
See full article at Vulture »

‘Spotlight’: Michael Keaton’s Chance at a ‘Make-Up’ Oscar From the Academy

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

At the 87th Academy Awards earlier this year, Michael Keaton was many prognosticator’s best actor front-runner for his performance in director Alejandro Iñárritu‘s Birdman. The legendary actor had a career resurgence in the role of Riggan Thomson (much needed after nearly a decade between major film roles) and the film’s subject matter of artistry and stage production/film making, both of which have been recipes for Oscar success for past performers. However, the award that night went to 33-year old British actor Eddie Redmayne for his role as physicist Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything.

This year, Keaton again finds himself in a film surrounded by Oscar buzz, Spotlight, which centers on the investigation by Boston Globe journalists into the Catholic Church child molestation scandal. Keaton’s performance has garnered much positive attention and may likely lead to a second nomination for the 64-year old actor.
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

From Robinson's Toyboy to Intrepid Drug Smuggler: Fairbanks Jr on TCM

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ca. 1935. Douglas Fairbanks Jr. was never as popular as his father, silent film superstar Douglas Fairbanks, who starred in one action-adventure blockbuster after another in the 1920s (The Mark of Zorro, Robin Hood, The Thief of Bagdad) and whose stardom dates back to the mid-1910s, when Fairbanks toplined a series of light, modern-day comedies in which he was cast as the embodiment of the enterprising, 20th century “all-American.” What this particular go-getter got was screen queen Mary Pickford as his wife and United Artists as his studio, which he co-founded with Pickford, D.W. Griffith, and Charles Chaplin. Now, although Jr. never had the following of Sr., he did enjoy a solid two-decade-plus movie career. In fact, he was one of the few children of major film stars – e.g., Jane Fonda, Liza Minnelli, Angelina Jolie, Michael Douglas, Jamie Lee Curtis – who had successful film careers of their own.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hepburn Day on TCM: Love, Danger and Drag

Katharine Hepburn movies. Katharine Hepburn movies: Woman in drag, in love, in danger In case you're suffering from insomnia, you might want to spend your night and early morning watching Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" series. Four-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Katharine Hepburn is TCM's star today, Aug. 7, '15. (See TCM's Katharine Hepburn movie schedule further below.) Whether you find Hepburn's voice as melodious as a singing nightingale or as grating as nails on a chalkboard, you may want to check out the 1933 version of Little Women. Directed by George Cukor, this cozy – and more than a bit schmaltzy – version of Louisa May Alcott's novel was a major box office success, helping to solidify Hepburn's Hollywood stardom the year after her film debut opposite John Barrymore and David Manners in Cukor's A Bill of Divorcement. They don't make 'em like they used to Also, the 1933 Little Women
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Actress Wright: Made Oscar History in Unmatched Feat to This Day

Teresa Wright movies: Actress made Oscar history Teresa Wright, best remembered for her Oscar-winning performance in the World War II melodrama Mrs. Miniver and for her deceptively fragile, small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's mystery-drama Shadow of a Doubt, died at age 86 ten years ago – on March 6, 2005. Throughout her nearly six-decade show business career, Wright was featured in nearly 30 films, dozens of television series and made-for-tv movies, and a whole array of stage productions. On the big screen, she played opposite some of the most important stars of the '40s and '50s. It's a long list, including Bette Davis, Greer Garson, Gary Cooper, Myrna Loy, Ray Milland, Fredric March, Jean Simmons, Marlon Brando, Dana Andrews, Lew Ayres, Cornel Wilde, Robert Mitchum, Spencer Tracy, Joseph Cotten, and David Niven. Also of note, Teresa Wright made Oscar history in the early '40s, when she was nominated for each of her first three movie roles.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Can you ace HitFix's brutal 21-question Oscars quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you ace HitFix's brutal 21-question Oscars quiz?
The Oscars are less than 96 hours away, so you only have a limited amount of time to brag about your insane knowledge of Academy Awards history. Ready for a brutal 21-question foray into Oscar's grisly past? Let's roll. (We give you the questions on the first page. Jot down your responses, then check the answers, along with the accompanying questions, on the next page. The videos embedded here aren't related to the questions. They're just fun!) 1. What ‘90s Best Actor winner gave the shortest onscreen performance ever nominated (and therefore awarded) in that category? This is measured by total minutes and seconds spent onscreen. 2. The first (and so far only) black female nominee in the Best Original Screenplay category was a co-writer of what biopic released in the 1970s? 3. From 1937 to 1945, the Academy guaranteed nominations in one particular category to any studio that submitted a qualifiable entry. What was the category?
See full article at Hitfix »

The 10 Worst Oscar Acting Snubs of the Last 10 Years

The 10 Worst Oscar Acting Snubs of the Last 10 Years
While it's not exactly the kind of consolation prize the likes of Jake Gyllenhaal, Ralph Fiennes, David Oyelowo, Rene Russo, Josh Brolin and Jessica Chastain wanted this morning, they have now entered into a different kind of Oscar history: The long-standing tradition of undeserved acting snubs. It is a club that is just as prestigious -- if not more so -- than the one made up nominees themselves, even if it comes without any sort of official celebration. Read More: The 10 Biggest Surprises of the 2015 Oscar Nominations Consider the company: Bette Davis for "Of Human Bondage" or Dennis Hopper for "Blue Velvet" or Judy Garland for "The Wizard of Oz" or Jimmy Stewart for "Vertigo." Or the following ten folks, who make up our obviously subjective list of the 10 worst acting Oscar snubs of the past 10 years. And we definitely encourage thoughtful use of the comments to offer your own picks for tragic Oscar misses.
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: AFI Awards 2014 Montage

The American Film Institute is probably best known for those lists of the 100 Greatest Movies of All Time (y'know... if it's an American production in some way). Well, every year they hold their own awards, because every group of people has to have awards. They recognize the ten best films (for this year, it's eleven due to a tie) and the ten best television programs of the year. There are not winners in these categories, but each one gets celebrated. On that front, I kind of like the AFI approach to awards. Along with the awards, AFI has put together this four and a half minute montage chronicling the last 120 years of film. Now, it would be ridiculous to cover every single year. Instead, they start with 1894's Strong Man and jump every ten years, showcasing films like Rear Window, The Godfather: Part II, Pulp Fiction, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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