5.2/10
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28 user 8 critic

The Man from Utah (1934)

Passed | | Western | 15 May 1934 (USA)
In a horse-riding rodeo contest bad guys want John Weston to lose. When he doesn't go along they add some insurance: a poisoned needle just under his saddle.

Director:

Robert N. Bradbury (as Robert Bradbury)

Writers:

Lindsley Parsons (story), Lindsley Parsons (screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Wayne ... John Weston
Polly Ann Young ... Marjorie Carter
Anita Campillo ... Dolores (as Anita Compillo)
Edward Peil Sr. ... Spike Barton (as Edward Peil)
George 'Gabby' Hayes ... Marshal George Higgins (as George Hayes)
Yakima Canutt ... Cheyenne Kent
George Cleveland ... Nevada Sheriff
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Storyline

The Marshal sends John Weston to a rodeo to see if he can find out who is killing the rodeo riders who are about to win the prize money. Barton has organized the rodeo and plans to leave with all the prize money put up by the townspeople. When it appears that Weston will beat Barton's rider, he has his men prepare the same fate for him that befell the other riders. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

WHIRLING ROPES AND SNARLING GUNS IN THE GALLOPING GRIP OF A GLAMOROUS DRAMA! (original-release poster - all caps) See more »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film received its initial telecasts in Syracuse Sunday 1 May 1949 on WHEN (Channel 8), in Detroit Tuesday 17 May 1949 on WXYZ (Channel 7), in Los Angeles Sunday 31 July 1949 on KTSL (Channel 2) and Saturday 4 March 1950 on KECA (Channel 7), in Cincinnati Monday 5 September 1949 on WCPO (Channel 7), and in Philadelphia Monday 5 December 1949 on WFIL (Channel 6); in New York City its earliest documented telecast occurred Monday 21 August 1950 on WOR (Channel 9). See more »

Goofs

During the carriage ride, you can clearly see telephone/electrical poles on the road. These were not around in the old west. See more »

Quotes

Marshal George Higgins: It seems mighty funny to me that every time this gang organizes a rodeo, their own men win all the first prizes. When it begins to look like an outsider is going to win, he gets sick. Two or three has even died from it.
John Weston: Well, you can't arrest them for that, Marshal.
Marshal George Higgins: No, maybe not. But it's might peculiar that when these outsides fall off them top broncs, they're suffering from snakebite. I tell ya, it just ain't natural.
John Weston: What do you want me to do? Get snake bit?
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Alternate Versions

Fox/Lorber Associates, Inc. and Classics Associates, Inc. copyrighted a version in 1985 with a new original score composed and orchestrated by William Barber. It was distributed by Fox/Lorber and ran 52 minutes. See more »

Connections

Remade as Lawless Cowboys (1951) See more »

Soundtracks

Sing Me a Song of the Wild
(uncredited)
Written by Robert N. Bradbury
Sung by John Wayne (dubbed by Jack Kirk) in the opening scene
See more »

User Reviews

 
Someone at the Encore Channel is insane...
20 July 2010 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

I just watched a couple of John Wayne's old B-westerns on the Encore Channel and was taken aback by someone's brilliant idea to replace the musical soundtrack! Instead of the original music, new and much louder music is present--and it sounded especially weird with the electronic instruments used to make it. After all, it wasn't like they used synthesizers in 1934!! Overall, this is a BAD thing--and I recommend you just download the free movie as linked by IMDb, as the music is just annoying--and even worse than in "The Lucky Texan". What idiot thought doing this was a good idea?!

Like the other new tricked-out B I just saw ("The Lucky Texan"), this one also featured George "Gabby" Hayes. And, like "The Lucky Texan", you might have trouble recognizing Gabby at first, as he doesn't sport his usual huge raccoon-like beard...and is a bit more macho than usual. After all, you certainly don't expect to see him playing a US Marshall!

As for the plot, it's pretty bad...even by B standards. That's because HUGE segments of the film consist of nothing but old rodeo footage and the plot involving a fixed rodeo competition is a cheap way to make use of this film. Wayne plays 'Weston'--a guy who shows himself to be very handy with his fists, on a horse and with a gun. As far as his singing goes, like Wayne's 'Singing Sandy' films, it is very, very obvious that it's not him doing the singing and fortunately this singing persona soon was abandoned in upcoming films.

As a result of lots of padding and the Encore soundtrack, it's definitely among the least watchable of Wayne's B-westerns. It's really a shame, as normally Wayne's Bs hold up pretty well...just not this one.

By the way, please note the 1930s fashions on the leading lady. I guess historical anachronisms weren't much of a concern with this film!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 May 1934 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Rodeo See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Encore-Westerns Library Print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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