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Shirley Temple: Academy pays tribute at 2014 Oscars

Child star of 1930s and 40s remembered at Oscars ceremony after her death earlier this year

• Xan Brooks liveblogs the ceremony

• Full list of winners as they're announced

The Oscars paid tribute to Shirley Temple, the Oscar-winning child star who died last year – devoting part of its traditional In Memoriam section to the actor.

Temple was given an honorary juvenile Oscar in 1935 at the age of six, after a string of box-office successes including Bright Eyes and Baby Take a Bow helped to distract America in the throes of the Depression. Her screen career flourished during the 1930s, before taking a downturn during the second world war, followed by her official retirement in 1950. Apart from a few subsequent TV appearances, Temple turned to a political career, and served as Us ambassador to both Ghana and Czechoslovakia, among other high-profile posts.

Temple, who used the name Temple Black after her 1950 marriage to Charles Alden Black,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Remembering Shirley Temple: 5 Darling Movies From the Original Child Star

She warmed the hearts of millions when she came onto the scene in the early 1930s, and Hollywood learned today (February 11) that it lost a legend in Shirley Temple Black. Coined "The Original Child Star," the 85-year-old actress starred in a plethora of memorable big screen creation in her younger years, using her bright eyes and dimples to cheer up the Depression Era.

In honor of the late "On the Good Ship Lollipop" darling, GossipCenter looks back on five of Shirley's most adorable movies. Check out the list below!

1. "The Little Princess" (1939)

Also starring Richard Greene and Anita Louise, “The Little Princess” saw Temple as a young lady who ends up living at a private school for girls after her father was shipped off to Africa to fulfill his responsibilities in the Army. However, when her dad was declared ‘mission in action’ she was forced to scrub floors perform various
See full article at GossipCenter »

Remembering Shirley Temple Black, Cinema's Most Iconic Child Star (Movie Clips)

Remembering Shirley Temple Black, Cinema's Most Iconic Child Star (Movie Clips)
Shirley Temple Black (1928-2014), the most iconic child star of film history who was a box office sensation throughout the 1930s, has died at age 85. Known for her dimples and perfectly-ringleted head of curls (56 ringlets, to be exact), Temple broke into the movies at only three years old, and went on to star in a series of vehicles (many of which were the VHS staples of my childhood) like "Bright Eyes," "Little Miss Marker," "Stand Up and Cheer," "The Little Colonel," "Baby Take a Bow," "Heidi," "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" and "The Little Princess," to name only a few. More than just a cute face, Temple had a remarkable ability for song and dance routines, as exemplified particularly in "The Codfish Ball" routine she does with Buddy Ebsen in "Captain January," where she matches the limber-legged Ebsen step for step in a four minute sequence. (Watch it, below.) "The Little Princess
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Shirley Temple Black obituary

Cherubic child star of the 1930s who returned to public life as a Us diplomat

From 1934 to 1938, when she was at the height of her fame, Shirley Temple (later known as Shirley Temple Black), who has died aged 85, appeared in films as a bright-eyed, curly-topped, dimpled cherub, whose chirpy singing and toddler's tap dancing were perfect antidotes to the depression. "During this depression, when the spirit of the people is lower than at any other time, it is a splendid thing that, for just 15 cents, an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles," Franklin D Roosevelt stated in 1935, referring to the world's biggest and littlest star.

Temple's message was "be optimistic", the title of the song she sang in Little Miss Broadway (1938). Her biggest hit songs were On the Good Ship Lollipop, from Bright Eyes (1934), which describes a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

One of Top Stars of Hollywood's Studio Era and Later on a pro-Vietnam War, 'Conservative' Republican, Has Died

Shirley Temple dead at 85: Was one of the biggest domestic box office draws of the ’30s (photo: Shirley Temple in the late ’40s) Shirley Temple, one of the biggest box office draws of the 1930s in the United States, died Monday night, February 10, 2014, at her home in Woodside, near San Francisco. The cause of death wasn’t made public. Shirley Temple (born in Santa Monica on April 23, 1928) was 85. Shirley Temple became a star in 1934, following the release of Paramount’s Alexander Hall-directed comedy-tearjerker Little Miss Marker, in which Temple had the title role as a little girl who, left in the care of bookies, almost loses her childlike ways before coming around to regenerate Adolphe Menjou and his gang. That same year, Temple became a Fox contract player, and is credited with saving the studio — 20th Century Fox from 1935 on — from bankruptcy. Whether or not that’s true is a different story,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Shirley Temple Dead at 85 -- Hollywood Reacts

  • TooFab
One of the most beloved child stars ever has passed away.Shirley Temple, also known as Shirley Temple Black, died on Tuesday from natural causes at the age of 85.According to a statement from her loved ones, the former actress "was surrounded by her family and caregivers. "We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and most importantly as our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and adored wife for fifty-five years of the late and much missed Charles Alden Black," the statement continues.Known for her trademark curls and the song "On the Good Ship Lollipop," Temple starred in films like "Stand Up and Cheer!," "Bright Eyes," "Baby Take a Bow," "A Little Princess" and "Heidi" back in the 1930s. She was also given a mini Oscar for her work.After retiring from films in the 1950s, Temple Black also worked in politics. She
See full article at TooFab »

Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014

Here's the last kind of news you want to hear, first thing in the morning. Shirley Temple Black, the quintessential child star, has passed away at 85 years old.

Temple's career exploded at the sage old age of 5, when she appeared in a string of massively successful hits for 20th Century Fox in 1934, including Little Miss Marker, Baby Take a Bow, and Bright Eyes. So fast and so complete was her success, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences created a brand new award that year just so that she could receive it, the non-competitive Special Oscar for best juvenile performance. She appeared in a shocking number of films throughout the 1930s, dominating the box office and generally making everybody much less depressed that there was a Depression on. Her career continued strongly until 1949, with the actress still appearing in classics like The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer and John Ford
See full article at FilmExperience »

Shirley Temple Black dies at 85

Shirley Temple Black dies at 85
Shirley Temple Black, the pudgy-cheeked child movie star who was a fount of gumption and cheer throughout the Great Depression, died Monday at the age of 85, a family spokesperson said in a statement. “We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and most importantly as our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and adored wife of fifty-five years,” the statement said.

Even during some of the roughest financial times this country has ever seen, little Shirley Temple was able to put smiles on moviegoers’ faces with her trademark head of of 56 curls and those silver-bullet dimples.
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Shirley Temple Black dies at 85

Shirley Temple Black dies at 85
Shirley Temple Black, the pudgy-cheeked child movie star who was a fount of gumption and cheer throughout the Great Depression, died Monday at the age of 85, according to a family spokesperson said in a statement. “We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and most importantly as our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and adored wife of fifty-five years,” the statement said.

Even during some of the roughest financial times this country has ever seen, little Shirley Temple was able to put smiles on moviegoers faces. Before every big scene, her mother would tell her,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Shirley Temple Dies at 85

Shirley Temple Dies at 85
Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died, according to publicist Cheryl Kagan. She was 85. Temple, known in private life as Shirley Temple Black, died at her home near San Francisco. A talented and ultra-adorable entertainer, Shirley Temple was America's top box-office draw from 1935 to 1938, a record no other child star has come near. She beat out such grown-ups as Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Robert Taylor, Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranking of the top 50 screen legends ranked Temple at No.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Shirley Temple, Legendary Child Star, Dies at 85

Shirley Temple, Legendary Child Star, Dies at 85
Shirley Temple, the child star phenomenon of the 1930s who went on to a career in international diplomacy, died Tuesday in California at age 85.

A statement from her family provided to news organizations said she died at home in Woodside, Calif., of natural causes. “She was surrounded by her family and caregivers,” the BBC quoted the statement as saying. “We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and… our beloved mother, grandmother [and] great-grandmother.”

A string of non-stop hits starting with “Little Miss Marker” in 1934 and continuing with such films as “Captain January,” “Poor Little Rich Girl” and “Wee Willie Winkie” captured Depression-era America’s heart, keeping the troubled 20th Century Fox solvent.

The dimpled, blonde, curly-headed Temple was the nation’s top box office attraction from 1935-38 and one of the nation’s top wage earners. Reflecting the extent of her popularity, she
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shirley Temple Dead at 85

  • Moviefone
Martha Mendoza, Associated Press

San Francisco (AP) - Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died. She was 85.

Temple, known in private life as Shirley Temple Black, died Monday night at her home near San Francisco. She was surrounded by family members and caregivers, publicist Cheryl Kagan said.

"We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and most importantly as our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and adored wife for fifty-five years of the late and much missed Charles Alden Black," a family statement said. The family would not disclose Temple's cause of death.

A talented and ultra-adorable entertainer, Shirley Temple was America's top box-office draw from 1935 to 1938, a record no other child star has come near. She beat out such grown-ups as Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Robert Taylor,
See full article at Moviefone »

Philip French's screen legends: Shirley Temple | Film

No. 75: Shirley Temple 1928-

The daughter of a bank clerk, she was born in Santa Monica, a bus ride from Hollywood, and thrust into the movies at the age of three by a fanatically ambitious mother. In her sixth year, she went from supporting to starring roles, had two hit songs ("Baby Take a Bow", "The Good Ship Lollipop"), and was the eighth biggest box-office attraction in America. For the next five years, her confidence as a performer and brilliance as a mimic (in Stowaway she impersonated Eddie Cantor, Al Jolson, Bing Crosby, Ginger Rogers and Alice Faye in one virtuoso sequence, as well as conversing in Chinese) made her the biggest child phenomenon ever known. She was 20th Century Fox's greatest asset, the centre of a little industry of commercial spin-offs, the sweet, curly-haired, dimpled kid that every mother wanted her daughter to look like and the top-ranking Hollywood star,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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