6.8/10
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9 user

Rufus Jones for President (1933)

Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected President of the United States in this short musical comedy. The film features song and dance numbers by a seven year old Sammy Davis Jr..

Director:

Roy Mack

Writers:

A. Dorian Otvos (story), Cyrus Wood (story)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ethel Waters ... Mother of Rufus Jones
Sammy Davis Jr. ... Rufus Jones (as Sammy Davis)
Hamtree Harrington Hamtree Harrington
Dusty Fletcher Dusty Fletcher
Edgar Connor Edgar Connor
The Will Vodery Girls The Will Vodery Girls ... Dancing Ensemble
Russell Wooding Russell Wooding ... Leader of Vocal Ensemble
The Russell Wooding's Jubilee Singers The Russell Wooding's Jubilee Singers ... Vocal Ensemble
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Storyline

Rufus Jones, a black child, is elected President of the United States in this short musical comedy. The film features song and dance numbers by a seven year old Sammy Davis Jr.. Written by Thomas McWilliams <tgm@netcom.com>

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Genres:

Comedy | Musical | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 September 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Broadway Brevities (1933-1934 season) #2: Rufus Jones for President See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reels #1553-1554. See more »

Connections

Featured in That's Dancing! (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

Am I Blue?
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Akst
Lyrics by Grant Clarke
Performed by Ethel Waters
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User Reviews

 
It's a satire, albiet not a particular successful one. Great performances
15 January 2018 | by barrymn1See all my reviews

To see the legendary Ethel Waters at her prime, as well as such an early performance from Sammy Davis, Jr. makes this a must-see. This despite the rather stupid attempt at satire. It did little to advance the mid-1930's plight of Black folks, other than giving the actors paying jobs!

Enjoy it for the historic performances and try to ignore the pretty awful stereotypical goings-on.


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