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The Phantom Broadcast (1933)

Not Rated | | Mystery | 15 March 1933 (USA)
A handsome radio singer has it all--fame, money, adoring fans--but what no one knows is that his accompanist, a hunchbacked piano player, is actually the voice behind the arrogant, abusive ... See full summary »

Director:

Phil Rosen

Writers:

Tristram Tupper (screenplay), Tristram Tupper (story "Phantom of the Air")
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Cast

Cast overview:
Ralph Forbes ... Norman Wilder
Vivienne Osborne ... Elsa Evans
Arnold Gray ... Grant Murdock
Gail Patrick ... Laura Hamilton
Paul Page ... Dr. Robert Brooks
Pauline Garon ... Nancy
Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams ... Sandy Higgins (as Big Boy Williams)
Rockliffe Fellowes ... Joe Maestro
Harland Tucker Harland Tucker ... Program Manager (as Harlan Tucker)
Carl Miller ... Lefty
Mary MacLaren ... Beth
George Nash George Nash ... Artist
Althea Henley Althea Henley ... Model
George 'Gabby' Hayes ... Police Lieutenant (as George Hayes)
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Storyline

A handsome radio singer has it all--fame, money, adoring fans--but what no one knows is that his accompanist, a hunchbacked piano player, is actually the voice behind the arrogant, abusive "singer"'s fame. The two men fall for the same girl, and when the singer turns up dead, suspicion falls upon his assistant and the girl. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Mystery

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 March 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

False Fronts See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono (Balsley and Phillips Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film's earliest documented telecast took place in New York City Saturday 8 April 1950 on WPIX (Channel 11). See more »

Goofs

Right after Murdock and Wilder have an argument, Murdock leaves the apartment in a huff. Immediately after, cab driver Sandy enters by a different door and states that he just passed Murdock in the hall and that he was in a hurry. However, it appears they would both have been going in different directions. See more »

Soundtracks

My Good-bye to You
Music by Norman Spencer and Bernard B. Brown (as Bernard Brown)
Lyrics by George Waggner
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User Reviews

 
Slow moving but fun to watch.
3 August 2007 | by dillon4004See all my reviews

The story moves very slowly, but that does not take away from the fun of watching this movie. The enjoyment is seeing the period of the early 1930's--in dress, hairstyles, furniture, automobiles, and the Art Deco design of the sets. Made in 1933, this movie is at about the height of the Art Deco movement, a movement that permeated the design of everything from architecture to kid's toys. Also notable is the slow speech. Since sound was fairly new in the movies and fast casual speech was often not caught by the infant equipment, the actors speak slower than by today's standards and with the clarity of trained stage actors. Since this is a Monogram Studio production, I suppose there were few multiple takes of the scenes and probably a low budget, but some of the performances are almost equal to those of better known film actors working for the high-priced studios of the day, and the sets are fairly elaborate for a low budget film. All in all, it's fun to watch this movie, in spite of the fact that the story leaves a lot to be desired and moves at a snail's pace.


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