7.7/10
7,181
82 user 41 critic

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama, Musical | 27 May 1933 (USA)
Trailer
2:42 | Trailer
A wealthy composer rescues unemployed Broadway performers with a new play.

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

Erwin Gelsey (screenplay), James Seymour (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Warren William ... J. Lawrence Bradford
Joan Blondell ... Carol King
Aline MacMahon ... Trixie Lorraine
Ruby Keeler ... Polly Parker
Dick Powell ... Brad Roberts
Guy Kibbee ... Faneul H. Peabody
Ned Sparks ... Barney Hopkins
Ginger Rogers ... Fay Fortune
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Storyline

Chorus girls Polly, Carol and Trixie are ecstatic when they learn that Broadway producer Barney Hopkins is putting on a new show. He promises all of the girls parts in the new show and even hires their neighbor Brad Roberts, an unknown composer, to write some of the music. There's only one problem: he doesn't have the money to bankroll it all. That problem is solved when Brad turns out to be quite rich but he insists that he not perform. When opening night comes, the juvenile lead can't go on forcing Brad to take the stage. He's recognized of course and his upper crust family wants him to quit. When he refuses, they tell him to end his relationship with Polly or face having his income cut off. When Brad's snobbish brother Lawrence mistakes Carol for Polly, the girls decide to have a bit of fun and teach him a lesson. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

REVEL IN THESE MIGHT SPECTACLES -- "The Parade of the Gold Diggers" "The Stairway to the Stars" "The Flower Garden of Girls" "The Ballet of the Snows" "The Dance of the Singing Violins" "The Pageant of the Forgotten Man" See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the stage managers yelling "Get ready for the 'Forgotten Man' number!" is the film's choreographer, Busby Berkeley. See more »

Goofs

When Peabody informs Brad and Polly that he and Trixie are married; Brad, in turn, informs Peabody that he and Polly are married. Peabody acts astonished and offers his congratulations. However in a previous scene, Peabody read the newspaper headline announcing Brad and Polly's wedding, therefore, this scene is confusing and not logical since Peabody already knew that they were married. See more »

Quotes

Trixie Lorraine: [whispers to Fay] One more look at him with those bedroom-eyes and I'll break your leg!
[loudly, to all]
Trixie Lorraine: Excuse me for whispering; Fay and I have so much in common!
See more »


Soundtracks

High Life
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Played when Carol suggests that Lawrence thinks the dancing is vulgar
See more »

User Reviews

ereway inay the oneymay!!
31 October 2003 | by movibuf1962See all my reviews

I've heard of this movie for years, but didn't actually see it until last week when Turner Classic Movies ran it. And it is positively stunning!! On the surface, it moves almost like a carbon copy of 42ND STREET- right up to the last-minute switch in players before the curtain goes up (although in this film, it's Dick Powell instead of Ruby Keeler). But its astringent look at trying to play Tin Pan Alley smack in the middle of the Depression gives it a very adult and tragic significance. It still has the Berkley dazzle- from the "Shadow Waltz" chorus girls (and electric violins) to the now-legendary "We're In The Money" dress rehearsal fronted by a pre-Astaire Ginger Rogers. (I was a teenager when my mother mentioned that one verse of this song was actually sung in Pig Latin- and I swore for twenty-five years that she was pulling my chain. It is one of the cleverest vocal interludes I've ever seen and heard.) But the three girls implied in the film's title- Ruby Keeler, Aline McMahon, and especially the sharp, smart, and gorgeous Joan Blondell- are the best things in the movie. And Blondell fronts the sublime finale number "Forgotten Man-" which pays tribute to the men (and women) of WWI and the ironies which followed. The staging of it- the marching which goes from triumphant to tragic, the torchy, gospel-like vocal of Etta Moten (the black woman sitting in the window), and the pullback shot of everyone coming downstage at the fadeout- is truly spectacular.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 May 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Golddiggers of 1933 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$433,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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