A wealthy composer rescues unemployed Broadway performers with a new play.

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

Erwin Gelsey (screenplay), James Seymour (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Warren William ... J. Lawrence Bradford
Joan Blondell ... Carol King
Aline MacMahon ... Trixie Lorraine
Ruby Keeler ... Polly Parker
Dick Powell ... Brad Roberts
Guy Kibbee ... Faneul H. Peabody
Ned Sparks ... Barney Hopkins
Ginger Rogers ... Fay Fortune
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Storyline

Chorus girls Polly, Carol and Trixie are ecstatic when they learn that Broadway producer Barney Hopkins is putting on a new show. He promises all of the girls parts in the new show and even hires their neighbor Brad Roberts, an unknown composer, to write some of the music. There's only one problem: he doesn't have the money to bankroll it all. That problem is solved when Brad turns out to be quite rich but he insists that he not perform. When opening night comes, the juvenile lead can't go on forcing Brad to take the stage. He's recognized of course and his upper crust family wants him to quit. When he refuses, they tell him to end his relationship with Polly or face having his income cut off. When Brad's snobbish brother Lawrence mistakes Carol for Polly, the girls decide to have a bit of fun and teach him a lesson. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

REVEL IN THESE MIGHT SPECTACLES -- "The Parade of the Gold Diggers" "The Stairway to the Stars" "The Flower Garden of Girls" "The Ballet of the Snows" "The Dance of the Singing Violins" "The Pageant of the Forgotten Man" See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

First film of Marlo Dwyer. See more »

Goofs

When J. Lawrence is talking to Carol about Polly and Brad's marriage; he threatens that if they are married he will have their marriage annulled. However, him not knowing of their marriage makes no sense because in the previous scene Peabody showed him a front-page article announcing their marriage. In addition, this is how he became aware that Carol was pretending to be Polly. See more »

Quotes

Carol King: I'm going to throw them out.
Trixie Lorraine: After what he called you! A parasite. What is a parasite? You'd better resent it.
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Connections

Referenced in Porky's Snooze Reel (1941) See more »

Soundtracks

Shadow Waltz
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Al Dubin
Sung by Dick Powell, Ruby Keeler and chorus
Reprised also in the show
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User Reviews

 
THE HAPPY ENDING IS NOT THE END.
5 November 2000 | by marksweeneySee all my reviews

There is a pattern to 1930's Hollywood musicals; struggle to put on show proceeds alongside struggle for love to conquer all. And in the end both struggles are successfully concluded. It is a pattern that is broken by "Gold Diggers Of 1933". Sure, all of the usual elements are in place, including the Hungry, Penniless Showgirl Depression setting. But where this movie differs is in the fact that after the various plot strands are neatly tied up, it doesn't end. Instead, we are treated to the last big production number,"My Forgotten Man", as downbeat as it was possible to get in 30's Hollywood. All the Busby Berkeley musicals paid lip service to the Great Depression, but this one goes much further, as "My Forgotten Man" was the last, most enduring image of the film, and the one that audiences left the theatre with. It's placement was a brave decision on the part of whoever made it, and it would be interesting to learn of the public reaction at the time. Because while it is undoubtedly true that in an era of deprivation, you can't blithely make movies that are totally divorced from reality, it's equally true that people want to be reassured there is a better life, and they won't be scratching around in the dirt forever. Personally, I love the number, and it's placement. It's something that has fascinated me since my very first viewing 7 years ago, but it seems to be a point that not a lot of critics have picked up on. Perhaps it wasn't so unusual after all!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 May 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Golddiggers of 1933 See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$433,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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