A bandleader woos a Latin flame who is already engaged to his employer.

Director:

Thornton Freeland

Writers:

Cyril Hume (screen play), H.W. Hanemann (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Dolores del Rio ... Belinha De Rezende (as Dolores Del Rio)
Gene Raymond ... Roger Bond
Raul Roulien ... Julio Rubeiro
Ginger Rogers ... Honey Hale
Fred Astaire ... Fred Ayres
Blanche Friderici ... Dona Elena De Rezende
Walter Walker Walter Walker ... Senor De Rezende
Etta Moten Etta Moten ... The Colored Singer
Roy D'Arcy ... One of the Three Greeks
Maurice Black ... One of the Three Greeks
Armand Kaliz ... One of the Three Greeks
Paul Porcasi ... The Mayor
Reginald Barlow ... The Banker
Eric Blore ... The Head Waiter
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Storyline

Aviator and band leader Roger Bond is forever getting his group fired for flirting with the lady guests. When he falls for Brazilian beauty Belinha de Rezende it appears to be for real, even though she is already engaged. His Yankee Clippers band is hired to open the new Hotel Atlântico in Rio and Roger offers to fly Belinha part way home. After a mechanical breakdown and forced landing, Roger is confident and makes his move, but Belinha plays hard to get. She can't seem to decide between Roger and her fiance Júlio. When performing the airborne production number to mark the Hotel's opening, Júlio gets some intriguing ideas... Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Girls that glitter! Stars that startle! Tunes that tease! Romance and spectacle set to rhythm and staged above the clouds! (Print Ad- Cortland Standard, ((Cortland, NY)) 19 January 1934) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song "The Carioca" and the dance of the same name were created for the film. The dance duet by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers dazzled audiences and created a "Carioca" dance craze around the country. "Carioca" is a word that means a native or inhabitant of the city of Rio de Janeiro, just like "Parisian" means a native or inhabitant of the city of Paris. See more »

Goofs

From the height they were flying, most of the "dance" routines of the young women on the plane wings would not be visible to people on the ground. See more »

Quotes

Julio Rubeiro: You'll be seeing her in Rio, of course?
Roger Bond: That's the catch. She wouldn't tell me her name or address.
Julio Rubeiro: Oh, then it's all on your side.
Roger Bond: In the pig's monocle, she's dizzy about me!
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Connections

Featured in Complicated Women (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Flying Down to Rio
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Vincent Youmans
Lyrics by Gus Kahn and Edward Eliscu
Song performed by Fred Astaire
Dance performed by chorus
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User Reviews

A run of the mill musical except for the obvious addition.
5 July 2004 | by Scaramouche2004See all my reviews

By the time Flying Down to Rio was released in 1933, It was Warner Brothers who had been having the success as far as musicals were concerned.

Ruby Keeler and Dick Powell were the uncrowned King and Queen of song and dance land and in films like 42nd Street, Footlight Parade and Gold Diggers and the later movies Dames and Flirtation Walk they were paving the way for a motion picture genre that would continue in much the same vein for the next twenty years.

With kaleidescope routines expertly directed by Busby Berkeley via overhead cameras, the movie musical was finally taking shape bearing little or no resemblance to earlier dismal efforts like MGM'S Broadway Melody of 1929 or their equally unimpressive Hollywood Review from the same year.

RKO was at the time a struggling studio with huge debts and was on the verge of going bankrupt. However they decided to capitalize on this medium in an effort to pull themselves back into the black.

Flying Down to Rio was in all respects no different to any other of the films they produced at the time and I'm sure this film would have sank into obscurity and be long forgotten had it not been for the movie milestone it boasts.

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were cast as only 3rd and 4th billed performers, to all intents and purposes, the token dance act, a novelty. Neither of them had done much before. Ginger of course was beginning to make a name for herself. She had featured in both the fore-mentioned 42nd Street and Gold Diggers and was slowly working her way out of chorus lines into bit parts and the occasional solo number.

Fred had done less still. Already a well known stage star in America and Britain, he had just one previous film under his belt. A natural dancer of extraordinary talent, Fred was signed on as RKO's secret weapon in their efforts to make the best musicals.

However, no matter how dull the storyline to "Rio" is (and it is believe me) it is soon forgotten when Fred and Ginger perform their first ever screen dance, The Carioca, a musical number with Latin- American tempo complete with stunning costumes, guest singers and the very kaleidoscopic shots of which Busby Berkeley himself would have been proud. It is their only dance together in the film and their actual dancing is given very limited screen-time, but it was enough to cause Astaire/Rogers mania.

Forgive the cliche but the rest is history as they say.

So successful were they that they went on to appear in a further nine films together making them one of the most beloved and cherished screen partnerships ever.

Alone the Astaire/Rogers musicals of the thirties saved the studio from closure and they helped push Warner's, Keeler and Powell into second place, at least as far as musicals were concerned.

Astaire is given further opportunity to shine in two stunning solos which will leave the viewer in no doubt whatsoever why he was the very best at his chosen craft.

Complete with the now famous 'girls-strapped-onto-aeroplane-wings' scene and with the added talents of Delores Del Rio and Gene Raymond adding the romance, It all helps to make an otherwise dull film into a legendary silver screen gem.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Portuguese

Release Date:

29 December 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Flying Down to Rio See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$462,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Victor System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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