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Trouble in Paradise (1932)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Crime, Romance | 30 October 1932 (USA)
A gentleman thief and a lady pickpocket join forces to con a beautiful perfume company owner. Romantic entanglements and jealousies confuse the scheme.

Director:

Ernst Lubitsch

Writers:

Samson Raphaelson (screenplay), Grover Jones (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Miriam Hopkins ... Lily
Kay Francis ... Madame Mariette Colet
Herbert Marshall ... Gaston Monescu
Charles Ruggles ... The Major (as Charlie Ruggles)
Edward Everett Horton ... François Filiba
C. Aubrey Smith ... Adolph J. Giron
Robert Greig ... Jacques, Mariette's Butler
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Storyline

High class European thief Gaston Monescu meets his soul mate Lily, a pickpocket masquerading as a countess. The two join forces and come under the employ of Mme. Colet, the beautiful owner of the Colet perfume company. Gaston works as Mme. Colet's personal secretary under the alias Monsieur La Valle. Rumors start to fly as 'M. La Valle' steals Mme. Colet away from her other suitors. When the secret of his true identity catches up to him, Gaston is caught between the two beautiful women. Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the 500 movies nominated for the Top 100 Funniest American Movies. See more »

Goofs

(at around 10 mins) A very clearshadow of a boom mic moves against the wall/screen behind Lily, anticipating her next action (rising and moving toward Gaston). See more »

Quotes

Mariette Colet: When a lady takes her jewels off in a gentleman's room, where does she put them?
Gaston Monescu: On the - On the night table.
Mariette Colet: But I don't want to be a lady.
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Crazy Credits

In the opening credits the words 'Trouble in' appear and then a bed before the word 'paradise,' subliminally indicating that sex is at least part of the film's plot. It was done so subtly for the time that censors didn't notice it until the film's attempted re-release in 1935. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Trouble in Paradise
Music by W. Franke Harling
Lyrics by Leo Robin
Sung by Donald Novis over the opening credits
See more »

User Reviews

"Con-stantinople!"
12 May 1999 | by matt-201See all my reviews

In the first minutes, two nobles dressed to the teeth--the Second Earl of Bastrop and Lady Higgenbottom, let's say--exchange brittle, achingly witty repartee. It's all rather droll until Lady H. picks up the telephone to inform her staff at home that she'll be late for dinner. The director, Ernst Lubitsch, cuts to the other side of the conversation--and we see a fat landlady in a hovel crawling with cats looking baffled at the receiver and saying, "Whaddaya sayin'?" At that moment, you know that Lubitsch and his ideal-mate screenwriter, Samson Raphaelson, are playing a pretty sophisticated game--and in the nearly seventy years since this movie, comedy directors from Billy Wilder to George Cukor to Woody Allen have been playing catch-up.

TROUBLE IN PARADISE remains the most perfect of all sound comedies--it makes you feel as if you had consumed some celestial compound of champagne and helium. The surprise of the movie today is not the pleasure of its Lubitschian elegance, but the fact that the movie is screamingly funny at every turn--Lubitsch's smart bombs never miss their mark. And for all the applications of his "touch" we're grateful for, Lubitsch never again made anything so flawless--in these less-than-ninety minutes, he and Raphaelson turned dialogue comedy into Mozartean music.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | Russian | Spanish | German

Release Date:

30 October 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Golden Widow See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$519,706 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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