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74 user 82 critic

Trouble in Paradise (1932)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Crime, Romance | 30 October 1932 (USA)
A gentleman thief and a lady pickpocket join forces to con a beautiful perfume company owner. Romantic entanglements and jealousies confuse the scheme.

Director:

Ernst Lubitsch

Writers:

Samson Raphaelson (screenplay), Grover Jones (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
2 wins. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Miriam Hopkins ... Lily
Kay Francis ... Madame Mariette Colet
Herbert Marshall ... Gaston Monescu
Charles Ruggles ... The Major (as Charlie Ruggles)
Edward Everett Horton ... François Filiba
C. Aubrey Smith ... Adolph J. Giron
Robert Greig ... Jacques, Mariette's Butler
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Storyline

High class European thief Gaston Monescu meets his soul mate Lily, a pickpocket masquerading as a countess. The two join forces and come under the employ of Mme. Colet, the beautiful owner of the Colet perfume company. Gaston works as Mme. Colet's personal secretary under the alias Monsieur La Valle. Rumors start to fly as 'M. La Valle' steals Mme. Colet away from her other suitors. When the secret of his true identity catches up to him, Gaston is caught between the two beautiful women. Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"Little" Mary Pickford, the silent film star, liked Ernst Lubitsch's tasteful touches of suggestiveness enough to ask him to direct her in a film that would help her show more maturity on screen. But she did not get along with Lubitsch himself nor did she appreciate 'Rosita,' the film they made together. In later years she usually ranked it with her worst films. See more »

Goofs

(at around 10 mins) A very clearshadow of a boom mic moves against the wall/screen behind Lily, anticipating her next action (rising and moving toward Gaston). See more »

Quotes

Lily Vautier: Darling, remember, you are Gaston Monescu. You are a crook. I want you as a crook. I love you as a crook. I worship you as a crook. Steal, swindle, rob. Oh, but don't become one of those useless, good-for-nothing gigolos.
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Crazy Credits

In the opening credits the words 'Trouble in' appear and then a bed before the word 'paradise,' subliminally indicating that sex is at least part of the film's plot. It was done so subtly for the time that censors didn't notice it until the film's attempted re-release in 1935. See more »

Connections

Featured in Paramount Presents (1974) See more »

Soundtracks

Under the Bamboo Tree
(1902) (uncredited)
Written by Bob Cole, J. Rosamond Johnson and James Weldon Johnson.
Variations reprised as part of the score and during a ball sequence.
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User Reviews

The Summit Of PreCode Cinema
7 February 2002 | by fowler1See all my reviews

...and Ernst Lubitsch at his zenith. First things first: thank you to TCM for showing this recently. Of course I taped it, and of course I've practically worn the tape out by now, a month later.

Point #2: something is terribly wrong in Paradise if the peak era of his work, 29-33, remains in shadow today. Where are the VHS/DVD releases of these wonderful films? Nowhere that I can find them; hopefully the good folks at Turner will continue reviving the early sound Lubitsches. I waited 25 years to see this one again, and the wait was not in vain. Those 25 years put a bit of snow on my roof, but they also allowed me to drink in the ambrosia that is this film with a bit more appreciation than I had at 16. And what intoxicating ambrosia it is! Script, performances, directorial vision are all exquisite. The leads are inspired (oh, for a night with Kay Francis!); the supporting players, expertly calibrated farceurs. The utilization of music as ironic counterpoint to the visuals rivals Clair; the title song, sung over the opening credits, will make your heart race, and break, at the same time. And the look of the film (Art Deco, lovingly handrubbed to a burnished glow) will linger with you forever.

Again and again, Lubitsch pulls rabbits out of hats: scenes like the deepening of Herbert Marshall and Kay Francis' relationship from business to pleasure 'seen' in a clock face are emblematic of what makes this such a special film. Its story is slight, frothy, very nearly silly; yet Lubitsch's knowing observation of small, telling details makes it magical. TROUBLE is not a timeless film, anchored as it is to a very specific time (Long Ago) and place (Far Away), which only deepens its charm and its seductive tugging on the audience's sleeve. I've watched it three times in a night, and three times more the following night - not behavior I usually exhibit. But the siren call of its lively, civilized wit is such that I'm hitting 'rewind' the moment it ends - I don't want to break the spell and return to reality just yet. As fertile as the preCode era is, as many classics as that golden period continues to yield up to those willing to discover them...TROUBLE IN PARADISE is the most glorious of them all.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | Russian | Spanish | German

Release Date:

30 October 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Golden Widow See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$519,706 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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