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Thark (1932)

Aldwych farce. Acting as legal guardian of Kitty Stratton, Sir Hector Benbow sells the titular country house to Mrs Frush - who then complains that it is haunted. Various investigators and occupants spend a night searching for the ghost.

Director:

Tom Walls

Writers:

Ben Travers (play), Ben Travers (screenplay)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Tom Walls ... Sir Hector Benbow
Ralph Lynn Ralph Lynn ... Ronald Gamble
Mary Brough Mary Brough ... Mrs. Todd
Robertson Hare Robertson Hare ... Hook
Claude Hulbert Claude Hulbert ... Lionel Todd
Joan Brierley Joan Brierley ... Cherry Buck
Gordon James Gordon James ... Death
Evalyn Bostock Evalyn Bostock ... Kitty Stratton
Beryl de Querton Beryl de Querton ... Lady Benbow
Marjorie Corbett Marjorie Corbett ... Warner
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Miles Malleson
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Storyline

Aldwych farce. Acting as legal guardian of Kitty Stratton, Sir Hector Benbow sells the titular country house to Mrs Frush - who then complains that it is haunted. Various investigators and occupants spend a night searching for the ghost.

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Plot Keywords:

based on play | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy | Horror

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

31 October 1932 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Version of Mikä yö! (1945) See more »

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User Reviews

 
What you might say when you see a ghost
21 November 2009 | by ptb-8See all my reviews

Yes, THARK is an exclamation by a person who sees a ghost in this delightfully dippy haunted house comedy...and so you can easily see the risqué joke in the title. Today of course they just bellow F**CK. There were many haunted house comedies of this period generally between versions of the Cat And The Canary and right up to Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein or even Francis in a Haunted House. One of my favorite British scare comedies is The Haunted Lighthouse from about 1934. THARK (say it out loud) borrows also from The Cat Creeps, The Bat Whispers and any other films post 1927 lifted from plays about specters and weird butlers and stormy nights in a mansion, a burglary and perhaps a murder. See also THE PHANTOM OF CRESTWOOD. As far as rude movie titles go, it is a beauty and not bettered until THE AMAZING DR CLITTERHOUSE (clitoris) of the 40s. Hilarious!


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