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I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932)

Passed | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 19 November 1932 (USA)
Trailer
2:33 | Trailer
Wrongly convicted James Allen serves in the intolerable conditions of a southern chain gang, which later comes back to haunt him.

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Writers:

Robert E. Burns (by), Howard J. Green (screen play) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 3 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Paul Muni ... James Allen
Glenda Farrell ... Marie Woods
Helen Vinson ... Helen
Noel Francis ... Linda
Preston Foster ... Pete
Allen Jenkins ... Barney Sykes
Berton Churchill ... The Judge
Edward Ellis ... Bomber Wells
David Landau ... The Warden
Hale Hamilton ... Rev. Robert Allen
Sally Blane ... Alice
Louise Carter ... James Allen's Mother
Willard Robertson ... Prison Board Chairman
Robert McWade ... F.E. Ramsey
Robert Warwick ... Fuller
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Storyline

Having returned from fighting in World War I, James Allen doesn't want to settle into a humdrum life and decides to set off to find his fortune. He travels the length and breadth of America, working as a skilled tradesman in the construction industry. When times get tough however, he finds himself living in a shelter where an acquaintance suggests they go out for a hamburger. What the friend really has in mind is to rob the diner and Allen soon finds himself working on a chain gang with a long jail sentence. Allen manages to escape however and heads to Chicago where over several years he slowly but surely works his way up the ladder to become one of the most respected construction engineers in the city. His past catches up with him and despite protestations from civic leaders and his many friends in Chicago, he finds himself again on the chain gang. Escaping for a second time, he accepts that to survive, he must lead a life of crime. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Hers was the Kiss of Judas...He was CRUCIFIED on the chain gang! See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Film-Noir

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the pre-production phase, Robert E. Burns was asked to travel to Hollywood to serve as an advisor to the production. Burns smuggled himself into Los Angeles and onto the Warner Bros. studio lot, using the name Richard M. Crane. Burns not only suggested ideas for the script but also reportedly helped write dialogue. See more »

Goofs

Hale Hamilton listed as "Rev. Allen" in opening credits, addressed as "Clint" by Jim Allen at breakfast, signs his letter as "Clint," but is introduced to the pardon committee as "Robert." See more »

Quotes

James Allen: Don't you see, Marie? If you get a divorce, I'll give you anything you want. I swear I will.
Marie Woods: What's the use of arguing, arguing, arguing? I told you I'm satisfied with the way things are!
James Allen: Can't you see that neither of us will be happy this way?
Marie Woods: I'm happy! I'm taking no chances of letting you go! Hey, listen! You're going to be a big shot someday with plenty of sugar and I'm going to ride right along. Get that? Huh, I'm no fool. I'd be a sucker to let you go now.
James Allen: But I'm in love with another woman.
Marie Woods: ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Dr. No (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

Someone to Care For
(1932) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Played during the scene in the car by the lake
See more »

User Reviews

 
A true classic AND a brave indictment. Excellent!!!
1 August 2002 | by Night Must FallSee all my reviews

Without a doubt, this is one of the finest films I have seen. Paul Muni's performance is so good, it's practically indescribable. I thought he was extremely believable as the unduly accused and convicted James Allen. This story will rip your heart out, and rightly so. The film is very well done in every way, down to the smallest detail (best example of this: the disgusting looking prison food – if you can call it that). The use of newspaper headlines is extremely effective, as well as the very realistic scenes in the prison and work yard, and the whole environment in which Allen must live. The viewer can almost feel Allen's pain as the other inmate hammers away at his leg chains to give him a glimpse of hope toward freedom. However, even the scenes of Allen's life on the outside still evoke a sense of foreboding. This is a very powerful film.

I saw it as part of the Essentials series on Turner Classic Movies, and Robert Osborne said that the real-life protagonist on whom this film is based acted as a consultant. Since he was still on the run, however, he was not credited. The whole situation is so sad, and this sadness and feeling of oppression hang over the film with such realism, that sometimes it is as though you are watching Allen's life caught on videotape, instead of a motion picture. It is extremely gripping and downbeat, with a killer ending. The fact that it's a true story just adds to the pervasive feeling of doom. Way ahead of its time, and a brave picture to make in its indictment of the justice system. WOW.

TWO FAVORITE MOMENTS: 1) Allen looking directly at the policeman in the barbershop with a determined, steely glare, as if suddenly realizing that he will not be recognized, and simply defying the cop to recognize him. The barber doesn't recognize him either, even though the cop and barber have just been describing Allen. This scene, I am sure, meant to emphasize the incompetence of the police and justice system, without using any words to do so. Fantastically done. I am in awe.

2) Chain gang inmate Barney Sykes (played by supreme character actor Allen Jenkins), finally released from jail, is offered a ride from the prison staff, who are carting the coffin of a dead inmate off the grounds. Very matter-of-factly, as though he has done this before (and thus demonstrating the de-humanizing effects of prison life) Sykes hops up onto the back of the truck and sits right on the coffin. Upon seeing this out the window, the other inmates ruminate on the fact that there are only two ways to leave the chain gang – `get let out, or die out.'

I will not give the ending away, but if it doesn't move you to tears, I don't know what will. Haunting.

My ONLY (minor) problem with the film is that all of the ladies in Allen's life look so similar, I could barely tell them apart!

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!!! See it.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 November 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$195,845 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

Mono (original release)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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