6.8/10
120,359
471 user 129 critic

The Score (2001)

An aging thief hopes to retire and live off his ill-gotten wealth when a young kid convinces him into doing one last heist.

Director:

Frank Oz

Writers:

Daniel E. Taylor (story), Kario Salem (story) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
2,743 ( 56)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert De Niro ... Nick
Edward Norton ... Jack / Brian
Marlon Brando ... Max
Angela Bassett ... Diane
Gary Farmer ... Burt
Paul Soles Paul Soles ... Danny
Jamie Harrold ... Steven
Serge Houde ... Laurent
Jean-René Ouellet ... André (as Jean Rene Ouellet)
Martin Drainville ... Jean-Claude
Claude Despins ... Albert
Richard Waugh ... Sapperstein
Mark Camacho ... Sapperstein's Cousin
Marie-Josée Colburn ... Woman in Study (as Marie-Josee D'Amours)
Gavin Svensson Gavin Svensson ... Man in Study
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Storyline

Three generations of method acting giants unite for this crime thriller written by Kario Salem and directed by Frank Oz. Robert De Niro stars as Nick Wells, an aging thief whose specialty is safe-cracking and who is on the verge of retiring to a life of ease, running his jazz club and romancing his girlfriend Diane (Angela Bassett). But before he can ride off into the sunset, Nick is pressured to do one last job by his mentor and business partner, a flamboyant and extravagant upscale fence named Max (Marlon Brando). Max is plotting the heist of the Montreal Customs House, and he's got a man on the inside, Jackie Teller (Edward Norton), a talented but volatile crook who has managed to ingratiate himself with the facility's staff as a fellow employee suffering from cerebral palsy. Jackie bristles at Nick's interference in "his" score, however, and threatens violence when it seems he's going to be cut out of the action. In the meantime, Nick grows increasingly ill at ease about the ...

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There are no partners in crime


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During breaks, Marlon Brando would walk around the set naked because of the warm weather where the film was being shot. See more »

Goofs

Nick uses a PVS-14 night vision monocular to see the IR beams while he is in the basement about to go into the cage containing the safe. However IR beams do not show up red, they show up white when using night vision devices. See more »

Quotes

Nick Wells: [to Jack] You want my advice? Make a list of everything you want now and spend the next twenty five years getting it, slowly, piece by piece.
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Connections

Referenced in Rewind This! (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Green Dolphin Street
Written by Bronislau Kaper and Ned Washington
Performed by Cassandra Wilson
Produced by Howard Shore
Cassandra Wilson appears courtesy of Blue Note Records
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User Reviews

Standard plotting made better by cast
1 September 2003 | by bob the mooSee all my reviews

Nick Wells is a patient, professional, old school thief who works alone. A narrow escape convinces him that it is time to pack it up and settle down with his casual girlfriend Diane. However his middleman Max comes to him with a big score worth millions each and begins to try and convince him to do it. Acting as a downside to the job is Jack Teller, the guy with the insider information who Nick must work with as partners on the job. Even as trust is built between the three men, little things begin to be revealed that could put the whole job at risk.

Very few films are excellent in every regard, some have great plots but low production values where others have multimillion budgets but awful stories. The Score is rightly sold on it's cast for it as little else to offer an audience other than that. The plot is overly familiar and, while not bad, certainly doesn't hold any great surprises for anyone who's seen any `one last job' movies before. The telling is a little slow but holds the attention pretty well, while the job itself is unspectacular but enjoyable.

What makes it worth watching over many other similar twisty heist movies is the cast, who manage to make the material seem better by their inclusion. None of them really have anything special to work with but they all do well and do professional jobs. Norton is probably the standout of the film as he plays several types of character and is good in them all. De Niro does a reasonable job without being flashy or looking like he's making too much of an effort. Brando is OK but now always seems to have a half smile on his face to suggest he isn't taking anything seriously. I don't understand why Bassett bothered to be involved as her part is very small and doesn't add very much to the film – maybe it was a bigger part in the script?

Overall this film is basically nothing new and can be seen in many different forms at video stores world-wide. The thing that helps lift this a little above the rest is not the plot but the talented cast that have been assembled to run it. I enjoyed it and think it is worth watching for that.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Germany | Canada | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

13 July 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Score See more »

Filming Locations:

Kahnawake, Québec, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$68,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$19,018,807, 15 July 2001

Gross USA:

$71,107,711

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$114,252,154
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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