6.9/10
473
16 user 12 critic

Blessed Event (1932)

Passed | | Drama, Comedy | 10 September 1932 (USA)
Al Roberts writes a gossip column for the Daily Express. He will write about anyone and everyone as long as he gets the credit. He gets into a little difficulty with a hood named Goebel who... See full summary »

Director:

Roy Del Ruth

Writers:

Howard J. Green (screen play) (as Howard Green), Forrest Wilson (based on the play: "Blessed Event" by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Lee Tracy ... Alvin Roberts
Mary Brian ... Gladys Price
Dick Powell ... Bunny Harmon
Allen Jenkins ... Frankie Wells
Ruth Donnelly ... Miss Stevens
Emma Dunn ... Mrs. Roberts
Edwin Maxwell ... Sam Gobel
Ned Sparks ... George Moxley
Walter Walker Walter Walker ... Mr. Miller
Frank McHugh ... Reilly
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Storyline

Al Roberts writes a gossip column for the Daily Express. He will write about anyone and everyone as long as he gets the credit. He gets into a little difficulty with a hood named Goebel who sends Frankie to talk to Alvin. But Al has the confession of Frankie on cylinders so Frankie becomes his own bodyguard and information line. One person Al is always taking digs at is crooner Bunny Harmon, because he hates crooners. When he writes a story about Dorothy's blessed event, he comes to regret destroying her life. But more importantly to Al and Frankie, her man may end 'Spilling the Dirt' permanently. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Warner Bros.' Scandalous Comedy About Scandal Columnists! Learn about the hilarious philanderings of the Gossip King who rose from a keyhole to a national institution! (Print Ad- Vancouver Sun, ((Vancouver, BC)) 18 March 1933) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Comedy

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The photograph that Lee Tracy shows to Allen Jenkins as he describes the torments of the electric chair is genuine. It shows Ruth Snyder at the very moment of electrocution in the chair in 1928 and was taken by a reporter with a hidden camera strapped to his ankle. Just as the switch was pulled he crossed his legs and took the shot. See more »

Quotes

Alvin Roberts: I almost starved to death for two weeks.
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Connections

Referenced in Front Page Woman (1935) See more »

Soundtracks

How Can You Say No (When All the World Is Saying Yes)?
(1932) (uncredited)
Music by Joseph A. Burke
Lyrics by Al Dubin and Irving Kahal
Copyright 1932 by M. Witmark & Sons
Sung by Dick Powell
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User Reviews

 
Quite enjoyable...
15 November 2011 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

I was a bit torn on this one--I wasn't sure whether to give it a 7 or an 8. Either way, it's a very good little film. Apparently, James Cagney was supposed to originally star in the movie but Lee Tracy eventually got the role. This film is a very good fit for Tracy, as he was the only guy at Warner Brothers who could talk as fast as Cagney---or even faster! Tracy plays a Walter Winchell-like muckraking journalist. His scruples are minimal and he seems very willing to stretch the truth in order to tell a good story---even if it means hurting a few people in the process. Because of this, his fiancé isn't sure whether she should marry him and she begs Tracy to find another line of work. But, it's obvious Tracy LOVES the work--he lives, eats and breathes this sort of scandal. Along the way, there are a few juicy stories you see in the film--including a funny one with Allen Jenkins as a mobster and a distraught pregnant lady who is at her wits end.

The film works well because of its style and fast-paced script. A few very choice scenes also spice things up. The best is Tracy as he's giving a VERY vivid account of what it's like to be electrocuted--as Jenkins recoils in horror. My favorite was the cop at the end after he caught a shooter--seeing him slap the guy around was very funny (even if it does violate the crook's Constitutional rights). Plus, I saw one scene where Ned Sparks actually looked like he was about to smile! All in all, an incredibly breezy and enjoyable little film.

By the way, although the ending and overall message is very different, another great film about muckraking journalism is "Five Star Final" (1931) and it sure appears as if Warner Brothers was strongly inspired by this previous film to make "Blessed Event".


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 September 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bisbilhotices See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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