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Arsène Lupin (1932)

A detective is tasked to capture an elusive thief called Arsene Lupin.

Director:

Jack Conway

Writers:

Maurice Leblanc (play) (as Maurice Le Blanc), Francis de Croisset (play) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Barrymore ... Duke of Charmerace
Lionel Barrymore ... Guerchard
Karen Morley ... Sonia
John Miljan ... Prefect of Police
Tully Marshall ... Gaston Gourney-Martin
Henry Armetta ... Sheriff's Man
George Davis ... Sheriff's Man
John Davidson ... Gourney-Martin's Butler
James T. Mack James T. Mack ... Laurent (as James Mack)
Mary Jane Irving ... Marie
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Storyline

A charming and very daring thief known as Arsene Lupin is terrorizing the wealthy of Paris, he even goes so far as to threaten the Mona Lisa. But the police, led by the great Guerchard, think they know Arsene Lupin's identity, and they have a secret weapon to catch him. Written by Ken Yousten <kyousten@bev.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Mystery | Romance

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In a interview given in 1993, Karen Morley said that it was her favorite role and enjoyed working the Barrymores (Lionel and Jack). See more »

Goofs

After Guerchard gets a description of the suspect and is told there are five hobnails in the right heel, he asks to look at the cast of the shoe. After looking at it briefly, he says he will take the cast of the footprint too. However, when he leaves, he takes only the cast of the footprint. See more »

Quotes

Arsène Lupin: [fetching Sonia's evening gown from the maid and holding it up to admire it] Well, here we are. It's very nice! It's a little naughty. It's very ni - Do you think your father the general would approve of this?
Sonia: My father the general always said that a gentleman was a man who never went to bed with his spurs on.
Arsène Lupin: Isn't that a pity. I'm so fond of horses. I could give up riding...?
Sonia: Give me that dress!
Arsène Lupin: You can't get into it alone
Sonia: The maid will help me.
Arsène Lupin: The maid? I know more about unhooking than any maid in...
[...]
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Connections

Version of The Adventures of Arsène Lupin (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

Dance of the Maidens
(uncredited)
Music by Rudolf Friml
See more »

User Reviews

Great Fun for the Barrymore Brothers
27 November 2009 | by Michael_ElliottSee all my reviews

Arsene Lupin (1932)

*** (out of 4)

When John Barrymore got out of his contract with Warner, MGM wasted no time in signing him and even lesser time in putting him in a film with his brother Lionel. This was the first of five films they'd make together and their easy to spot rivalry really makes this film the charming gem that it is. An elderly detective (Lionel) is convinced that the Duke of Charmerace (John) is the infamous jewel thief known as Arsene Lupin. The detective will stop at nothing to prove his thoughts and that includes bringing in a sexy spy (Karen Morley). The story itself isn't anything ground breaking or Oscar-worthy but it is good enough to build up two nice characters and then stand back and let the actors do all the work. Fans of the brothers will certainly get a kick out of seeing the two men working together as both deliver very strong performances and they really make this film worth seeking out. What works best is the comic timing that the two men bring to the table as well as their rivalry. Each scene that the two men are in you can tell that they are trying to out act the other and this adds a charm that no two other actors could have captured. Just take a look at the sequence at the start when Lionel arrests John thinking that he's lying about being the Duke. Just watch this scene and then compare it to a later scene where John is holding Lionel captive until he can prove that he's really a cop. Morley also fits into the threesome quite well as she has an undeniable sexual tension with John and some fun comic touches with Lionel. The scene where she introduces herself to the Duke while naked in his bed is a pre-code gem. Some could argue that a stronger "story" would have helped matters and it might have but the cast doesn't even bother to speak with French accents so there's no doubt that the studio was just trying to get the two men in the same film. The ending packs a terrific punch as everything gets closed up very tightly and in a way that everyone, including the viewer, wins.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 March 1932 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Arsène Lupin See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$433,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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