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Dracula (1931)

Passed | | Drama, Fantasy, Horror | 14 February 1931 (USA)
Trailer
1:50 | Trailer
After a naive real estate agent succumbs to the will of Count Dracula, the two head to London where the vampire sleeps in his coffin by day and searches for potential victims by night.

Directors:

Tod Browning, Karl Freund (uncredited)

Writers:

Bram Stoker (by), Hamilton Deane (from the play adapted by) | 2 more credits »
5 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bela Lugosi ... Count Dracula
Helen Chandler ... Mina Seward
David Manners ... John Harker
Dwight Frye ... Renfield
Edward Van Sloan ... Van Helsing
Herbert Bunston ... Doctor Seward
Frances Dade ... Lucy Weston
Joan Standing Joan Standing ... Briggs - the Nurse
Charles K. Gerrard ... Martin (as Charles Gerrard)
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Storyline

After a harrowing ride through the Carpathian mountains in eastern Europe, Renfield enters castle Dracula to finalize the transferral of Carfax Abbey in London to Count Dracula, who is in actuality a vampire. Renfield is drugged by the eerily hypnotic count, and turned into one of his thralls, protecting him during his sea voyage to London. After sucking the blood and turning the young Lucy Weston into a vampire, Dracula turns his attention to her friend Mina Seward, daughter of Dr. Seward who then calls in a specialist, Dr. Van Helsing, to diagnose the sudden deterioration of Mina's health. Van Helsing, realizing that Dracula is indeed a vampire, tries to prepare Mina's fiance, John Harker, and Dr. Seward for what is to come and the measures that will have to be taken to prevent Mina from becoming one of the undead. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Carl Laemmle Presents The VAMPIRE THRILLER! (original posters) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Horror

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Carl Laemmle moved Universal to California in 1914, a version of "Dracula" was one of the first projects being considered. It was over fifteen years before this version was produced. See more »

Goofs

At one point, Dracula gets out of his Carfax Abbey coffin. In the background can be seen the great hall standing set for London After Midnight. A still exists of Lugosi carrying Chandler down these stairs and the scene is in the Spanish version. However, later his coffin is in the basement. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Young Girl Passenger: [reading from a Transylvanian tourist brochure] "Among the rugged peaks that frown down upon the Borgo Pass are found crumbling castles of a bygone age."
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Crazy Credits

Joan Standing, who played Briggs (a nurse), was credited as the maid, who was actually played by Moon Carroll. See more »

Alternate Versions

Shot in two versions simultaneously, using different actors: the English language version with Bela Lugosi and a Spanish language version (Dr&aacute;cula) with Carlos Villarías See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Immortal Movie Characters (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Swan Lake, Op.20
(1877) (uncredited)
Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Excerpt Played during the opening credits
See more »

User Reviews

 
Excellent
29 May 2011 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

Dracula(1931) mayn't be the definitive version of the brilliant Bram Stoker novel, but it is still a classic. My only complaints are the abrupt ending and David Manners as John, he tries his best but sometimes his line delivery is awkward and some of his lines are stilted.

I did also think that to a lesser extent the first half is better than the second. The opening scene is absolutely brilliant, but while there are still some compelling and well-done scenes the second half is rather talky. That said, there is a lot I loved about Dracula. The costumes, sets, photography and lighting are suitably atmospheric and grandiose, the story is still the timeless story even with the many changes I love and the screenplay apart from the odd stilted line from John is very good.

I saw Dracula in two versions, one without background music which added to the genuine atmosphere, and one with a suitably hypnotic and haunting score from minimalist composer Phillip Glass. While I loved Glass' score, I do prefer slightly the one without the scoring, the silence further added to the atmosphere I feel. The whole film is beautifully directed too, and while the film is very short at about an hour and a quarter the pace is just right.

The acting is very good, perhaps theatrical in a way but I think it worked. Bela Lugosi has such a magnetic presence in the title role, Edward Van Sloan is perfect as Van Helsing but in a sinister and funny performance Dwight Frye steals the film.

In conclusion, excellent film and a classic. 9/10 Bethany Cox


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hungarian | Latin

Release Date:

14 February 1931 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dracula See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$355,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$85,204
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Black and White (tinted)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »

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