5.9/10
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75 user 42 critic

Cimarron (1931)

Passed | | Drama, Western | 9 February 1931 (USA)
A newspaper editor settles in an Oklahoma boom town with his reluctant wife at the end of the nineteenth century.

Director:

Wesley Ruggles (uncredited)

Writers:

Edna Ferber (novel), Howard Estabrook | 1 more credit »
Won 3 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Richard Dix ... Yancey Cravat
Irene Dunne ... Sabra Cravat
Estelle Taylor ... Dixie Lee
Nance O'Neil ... Felice Venable
William Collier Jr. ... The Kid
Roscoe Ates ... Jesse Rickey (as Rosco Ates)
George E. Stone ... Sol Levy
Stanley Fields ... Lon Yountis
Robert McWade ... Louis Hefner
Edna May Oliver ... Mrs. Tracy Wyatt
Judith Barrett ... Donna Cravat (as Nancy Dover)
Eugene Jackson Eugene Jackson ... Isaiah
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Roberta Gregory Roberta Gregory ... Indian Girl
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Storyline

When the government opens up the Oklahoma territory for settlement, restless Yancey Cravat claims a plot of the free land for himself and moves his family there from Wichita. A newspaperman, lawyer, and just about everything else, Cravat soon becomes a leading citizen of the boom town of Osage. Once the town is established, however, he begins to feel confined once again, and heads for the Cherokee Strip, leaving his family behind. During this and other absences, his wife Sabra must learn to take care of herself and soon becomes prominent in her own right. Written by George S. Davis <mgeorges@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A milestone in picture History! "The Birth of a Nation," "The Four Horsemen"...and Now CIMARRON (Print Ad- Syracuse American, ((Syracuse NY)) 8 February 1931) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Western

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first film to be nominated for every major Academy Award. There were only eight categories in 1930-31, and with seven nominations (the most any film had garnered up until that time), Cimarron (1931) just missed being nominated in every category. As such, it was also the first film that stood a chance of sweeping all five major categories: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Screenplay -- a feat that would be accomplished just three years later with It Happened One Night (1934). See more »

Goofs

Mr. Levy says "Moses wrote the Ten Commandments". In fact according to the bible Moses brought down the Ten Commandments that had been written in stone by God. See more »

Quotes

Yancy Cravat: Sugar, if we all took root and squatted, there would never be any new country.
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User Reviews

 
A Historic But Very Dated Dunne-Dix Western
10 December 2006 | by ccthemovieman-1See all my reviews

This is a very dated western but so much so it makes it interesting to watch in spots. However, it's too long - 131 minutes - and I watched it on a VHS tape in which the sound quality wasn't the best, which helped make it too tough to watch in one sitting. Yet, for its uniqueness and strange-looking characters and strange scenes, it made it worthwhile to stick it through to the end. However, the first half of the film is a lot better than the second half.

This was Irene Dunne's first starring role and, frankly, I didn't recognize her. She was anything but pretty and certainly looked different. Her role was that a steady person who keeps her marriage together but has a major flaws, including a real prejudice against the local Indians. In the end, sees the error of her ways. Richard Dix plays her husband. He overacts and looks cartoonish most of the time. This movie was in the beginning of "talkies" and Dix still looked like he belonged in silent movies. He marries Dunne and quickly leaves to go wandering. He comes home briefly and leaves again....and it's okay. Strange.

The story revolves around the two leads (Yancy and Sabra Cravat") and the their town which grows from nothing into a big city by the late 1920s. Seeing that city grow was interesting.

Included in this movie was the strangest "gospel meeting" I've ever seen. It begins well-intentioned, but becomes so spiritually weak and so secular that it makes a farce out of the whole proceedings. You have to see this to believe it. I just shook my head in amazement about how Hollywood has never had a clue when it came to topics like this.

I got rid of the VHS long ago but, if given the opportunity, now that it is out on DVD, would give it another look. It's almost a curiosity piece.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

9 February 1931 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Cimarron See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,433,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Photophone System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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