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Moby Dick ()


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In this extremely loose adaptation of Melville's classic novel, Ahab is revealed initially not as a bitter and vengeful madman, but as a bit of a lovable scamp. Ashore in New Bedford, he... See more »

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Captain Ahab Ceely
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Faith
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Derek
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Queequeg
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Elijah (as Nigel de Brulier)
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Stubbs
May Boley ...
Whale Oil Rosie
Tom O'Brien ...
Starbuck
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Old Maid
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Reverend Mapple
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jay Berger ...
Boy (uncredited)
Ted Billings ...
Sailor (uncredited)
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Sailor (uncredited)
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First Mate (uncredited)
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Fat Fanny on Dock (uncredited)
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Boy (uncredited)
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Shanghai Lady Seller (uncredited)
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Shipping Agent - 'Boston Lass' (uncredited)
Cliff Saum ...
Mary Ann Crew Member (uncredited)
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Minor Role (uncredited)
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Mother of Many Children (uncredited)
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Blacksmith (uncredited)

Directed by

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Lloyd Bacon

Written by

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Herman Melville ... (by)
 
Oliver H.P. Garrett ... (adaptation)
 
J. Grubb Alexander ... (screen play and dialogue)

Produced by

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Hal B. Wallis ... producer
Harry M. Warner ... producer (uncredited)
Jack L. Warner ... producer (uncredited)

Cinematography by

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Robert Kurrle ... (photography)

Film Editing by

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Desmond O'Brien ... (edited by)

Costume Design by

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Earl Luick ... (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Charles David Forrest ... sound recording engineer (uncredited)

Special Effects by

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Fred Jackman ... technical effects

Music Department

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Erno Rapee ... general musical director
Louis Silvers ... conductor: Vitaphone Orchestra
William Axt ... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Henry Hadley ... composer: stock music (uncredited)
David Mendoza ... composer: stock music (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

In this extremely loose adaptation of Melville's classic novel, Ahab is revealed initially not as a bitter and vengeful madman, but as a bit of a lovable scamp. Ashore in New Bedford, he meets and falls for Faith Mapple, daughter of the local minister and beloved of Ahab's brother Derek. Faith herself quickly returns Ahab's love, as Derek is drab and ignoble. On his next voyage, however, Ahab loses a leg to the monstrous white whale Moby-Dick. When upon his return to New Bedford he mistakenly believes Faith wants nothing to do with him because of his disfigurement, Ahab returns to sea with only one goal in mind -- to find and kill the great white whale. Written by Jim Beaver

Plot Keywords
Taglines Far out in an angry sea. sailors grapple with monster whales in a combat to death. While home in New Bedford sweethearts pray for the safe landing of boats that seldom return! (Print Ad- Portsmouth Times, ((Portsmouth, Ohio)) 29 September 1930) See more »
Genres
Parents Guide View content advisory »
Certification

Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • La fiera del mar (Spain)
  • A Fera do Mar (Portugal)
  • Havets Dæmoner (Denmark)
  • O thalassokrator (Greece)
  • Havets härskare (Sweden)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 80 min
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Did You Know?

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Trivia _Moby Dick (1930_ featured an early, experimental use of widescreen known as Magnascope. As the boats were lowered for the first chase after the whale, the screen widened; then, as Moby Dick suddenly closed in on Captain Ahab, the screen returned to its normal size. This process had been used for selected sequences of important features at certain first run film run theatres since late 1926 when it was inaugurated with Old Ironsides (1926). There was no change in ratio. The screen got larger, by using a different lens, but lighting and magnification problems limited its use to special occasions. See more »
Movie Connections Alternate-language version of Dämon des Meeres (1931). See more »
Crazy Credits While the credits state that the film is based on Herman Melville's novel, the first page of the novel shown onscreen right after the credits is entirely written by one of the screenwriters; it has absolutely nothing to do with Melville's original, and even leaves out Melville's classic opening sentence, "Call me Ishmael". See more »
Quotes Faith Mapple: [to Capt. Ahab] Why... Why, Ahab Creely! You're crying!
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