5.7/10
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47 user 21 critic

Abraham Lincoln (1930)

An episodic biography of the 16th President of the United States.

Director:

D.W. Griffith

Writers:

Stephen Vincent Benet (adapted for the screen by), John W. Considine Jr. (story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William L. Thorne ... Tom Lincoln (as W.L. Thorne)
Lucille La Verne ... Mid-Wife
Helen Freeman ... Nancy Hanks Lincoln
Otto Hoffman ... Offut
Walter Huston ... Abraham Lincoln
Edgar Dearing ... Armstrong (as Edgar Deering)
Una Merkel ... Ann Rutledge
Russell Simpson ... Lincoln's Employer
Charles Crockett ... Sheriff
Kay Hammond ... Mary Todd Lincoln
Helen Ware ... Mrs. Edwards
E. Alyn Warren ... Stephen A. Douglas / General Grant
Jason Robards Sr. ... Herndon (as Jason Robards)
Gordon Thorpe Gordon Thorpe ... Tad Lincoln
Ian Keith ... John Wilkes Booth
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Storyline

Brief vignettes about Lincoln's early life include his birth, early jobs, (unsubstantiated) affair with Ann Rutledge, courtship of Mary Todd, and the Lincoln-Douglas debates; his presidency and the Civil War are followed in somewhat more detail, though without actual battle scenes; film concludes with the assassination. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The startling revelation of the real, human Lincoln- blazing with mighty drama, raging passion, tender romance- has aroused more widespread acclaim than any picture in fifteen years! (Print Ad- Philadelphia Inquirer, ((Philadelphia, Penna.)) 26 October 1930) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

James Bradbury Sr. (General Winfield Scott), Frank Campeau (General Philip Sheridan) and Robert Brower, who plays an uncredited role, are the only actors in the film who were alive during the American Civil War (1861-1865). They were born on October 12, 1857, December 14, 1864 and July 14, 1850 respectively. See more »

Goofs

Subtitles correctly describe the bombardment of Fort Sumter by the Confederates as starting the Civil War, but the film depiction shows the reverse. It has the fort firing on the Confederates. See more »

Quotes

Abraham Lincoln: [to Ann] Well, my old daddy taught me how to work, but he never taught me how to like it.
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Alternate Versions

Originally, this film was color-tinted in sepia-tone, with blue for night scenes. These prints also had a prologue. Current public-domain prints are in black and white, minus the prologue with a shorter running time. See more »

Connections

Edited into General Spanky (1936) See more »

Soundtracks

The Battle Cry of Freedom
(1862) (uncredited)
Written by George Frederick Root
Played and sung by marching soldiers
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User Reviews

"A nightmare of the mind and nerves" indeed, for Griffith and us!
26 January 2000 | by BobLibSee all my reviews

No doubt about it, D.W. Griffith was one of the great directors of the early silent era. "Birth of a Nation," "Intolerance," "Orphans of the Storm," even a lesser-known film like "The Musketeers of Pig Alley" are all now regarded as classics. Unfortunately, for whatever reasons, Griffith couldn't maintain his success record, and, by the time he made his first all-talking film, "Abraham Lincoln," he was in the midst of a major slump that he just couldn't pull out of. The film is static, stilted, and moves at a snail's pace. Walter Huston, Ian Keith, Henry B. Walthall, and most of the rest of the cast all had distinguished careers in sound films, but here they are merely wasted, unable to cope with the tedious dialogue and Griffith's uncharacteristicly stiff direction. Worst-served of all, though, is Una Merkel, here in one of her first films. I can't believe that Anne Rutlidge could have been such a sugary simp as we're led to believe by her performance here, and her death scene is only exceeded for bathos by Ali McGraw in the last scene of "Love Story." In sum, a major disappointment, a good cast wasted, and a sad farewell form one of American film's true pioneers. Griffith described making this film as "a nightmare of the mind and nerves," and, unfortunately, that's just what it is, for him and us.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 November 1930 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

D.W. Griffith's 'Abraham Lincoln' See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(TCM print) | (copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (MovieTone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »

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