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The Studio Murder Mystery (1929)

Passed | | Crime, Mystery | 1 June 1929 (USA)
Philandering actor Richard Hardell is murdered at a movie studio. His jealous wife Blanche, his director Rupert Borka, and a girl he mistreated, Helen MacDonald, all have substantial ... See full summary »

Director:

Frank Tuttle

Writers:

A. Channing Edington (based on magazine serial) (as The Edingtons), Carmen Ballen Edington (based on magazine serial) (as The Edingtons) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Neil Hamilton ... Tony White
Doris Hill ... Helen MacDonald
Warner Oland ... Rupert Borka
Fredric March ... Richard Hardell
Chester Conklin ... George (Studio Gateman)
Florence Eldridge ... Blanche Hardell
Guy Oliver ... MacDonald - the Studio Watchman
Donald MacKenzie ... Captain Coffin
Gardner James ... Ted MacDonald
Eugene Pallette ... Detective Lieutenant Dirk
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Storyline

Philandering actor Richard Hardell is murdered at a movie studio. His jealous wife Blanche, his director Rupert Borka, and a girl he mistreated, Helen MacDonald, all have substantial reasons for having wanted him dead. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

WHO KILLED THE MOST POPULAR STAR IN HOLLYWOOD? (Print ad-The Hutt News,((Lower Hutt, N. Z.)) 24 April 1930)

Genres:

Crime | Mystery

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 June 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Den okändes hämnd See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric System)| Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Florence Eldridge and Fredric March were married to each other. They were married from May 30, 1927 until his death on April 24, 1975. See more »

Quotes

Rupert Borka: No, no, no. That is terrible. Get up.
Richard Hardell: Well, what's the matter?
Rupert Borka: Matter? Well you cannot act. That is all. You do not feel it; you do not think it. Bah!
Richard Hardell: Want me to try again?
Rupert Borka: What for? I told you all week that you cannot act. Then I thought maybe if we came here and rehearsed here alone tonight... but it is useless. Why that dummy has more feeling than you.
Richard Hardell: Ohhh
[throws dummy out of chair and onto floor]
Richard Hardell: Now look here, Borka. Why don't you play ball? You agreed to give this part to the winner of ...
[...]
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Connections

References The Benson Murder Case (1930) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Not bad for an early talkie
15 June 2010 | by AlsExGalSee all my reviews

However, I'd say this will probably be of interest to you only if you are into the early talkies or film history. I viewed a very good print of this film, so there are some out there.

Richard Hardell (Fredric March) is a man who won a contest and opportunity to star in films, but he seems to be taking that opportunity to make enemies at every turn. His director (Warner Oland) suspects him of having an affair with his wife, Hardell's wife knows he's been unfaithful in the past and is suspicious that old habits die hard, and Hardell is actually having an affair with a young ingénue, Helen MacDonald, who finds out she's just one in a string of many girls on the side after Hardell has sworn his undying love. Finally, there is Helen's brother who knows about Hardell's wicked ways and how he is using his sister.

Hardell is found dead on the set, a knife sticking out of his chest, and the question is, of course, who among the many who had motives and opportunity actually did it. Others have called this slowly paced, but I thought it moved along briskly with good performances by all. You can figure the mystery out yourself if you pay close attention to what is going on and differentiate what you know you saw versus what most people could assume they saw leading up to the murder.

The best part of this film is getting a good look at the Paramount sound stages as there are some scenes in the film that actually show an early sound film shooting in progress. One key scene is definitely a shot of a silent film in progress, another has a sound film being shot complete with the old camera booths from the early sound era. The film itself has one foot in talkies and the other in silents as the scenes in which there is conversation are completely static - courtesy of sound technology of the time. You can also clearly see that the scenes in which the camera shows any movement are silent with some sound dubbed over them. This was a common technique in 1928 and 1929 as there was no other way to include action scenes in the Vitaphone era.

I'd say the one distraction in this film is Neil Hamilton, who plays struggling studio gag writer Tony White who loves tragic figure Helen MacDonald from afar. I thought he was quite good when he played more serious dramatic roles, but here he's given the smirking wise cracking style of Lee Tracy and it just doesn't suit him.


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