6.5/10
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Chasing Rainbows (1930)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama, Musical | 23 February 1930 (USA)
The road-show troupe of a top Broadway show go cross-country while taking the audience along on the on-stage scenes as well as what happens and is happening back stage of the production. ... See full summary »

Director:

Charles Reisner

Writers:

Robert E. Hopkins (story "Road Show") (as Robert Hopkins), Bess Meredyth (story "Road Show") | 5 more credits »
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Director: Harry Beaumont
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Caught Short is a 1930 American Pre-Code comedy film directed by Charles Reisner and written by Robert E. Hopkins, Joseph H. Johnson and Willard Mack. The film stars Marie Dressler, Polly ... See full summary »

Director: Charles Reisner
Stars: Marie Dressler, Polly Moran, Anita Page
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Cast

Cast overview:
Bessie Love ... Carlie Seymour
Charles King ... Terry Fay
Jack Benny ... Eddie Rock
George K. Arthur ... Lester
Polly Moran ... Polly
Gwen Lee ... Peggy
Nita Martan Nita Martan ... Daphne Wayne
Eddie Phillips ... Don Cordova
Marie Dressler ... Bonnie
Youcca Troubetzkov ... Lanning
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Storyline

The road-show troupe of a top Broadway show go cross-country while taking the audience along on the on-stage scenes as well as what happens and is happening back stage of the production. The spectacular dancing ensembles and colorful costumes and pulchritude on-stage offers a contrasting background to the drabness of the backstage, where joy, sorrow, tragedies, deception, and romance are intertwined. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

ALL-TALKING! - ALL-LAUGHING! - ALL-NEW! - IN TECHNICOLOR! (original poster - all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Passed
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 February 1930 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Road Show See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TCM Print) (incomplete)

Sound Mix:

Mono (MovieTone)

Color:

Color (Technicolor) (two sequences)| Black and White

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As shown on TCM, the film ends abruptly with no warning that it's over when Carlie pushes Terry out of the dressing room door. This is the result of the loss of the 2-strip Technicolor finale which ended the film. See more »

Quotes

Carlie Seymour: You haven't got the backbone of a jellyfish!
See more »

Connections

References King of Jazz (1930) See more »

Soundtracks

Lucky Me, Lovable You
(uncredited)
Music by Milton Ager
Lyrics by Jack Yellen
Sung by Charles King
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Kudos For Miss Love & Miss Dressler
5 May 2002 | by Ron OliverSee all my reviews

A troupe of musical comedy performers travel about the country, forever CHASING RAINBOWS of success & happiness.

This early MGM musical, considering its age and the obvious limitations brought on by the new sound technology, does a fair job in entertaining its audience. Although the film features a song that would become a classic ('Happy Days Are Here Again' by Milton Ager & Jack Yellen) it is on the strength of a couple of its performances that its modest success is based.

Pert & pretty Bessie Love is wonderful as a sweet young singer who adores her leading man. She is completely natural with the microphone and exhibits a tender talent which was never allowed to grow to its full potential in talking films. While good throughout, the scene in which she dissolves into hysterical laughter upon hearing some emotionally devastating news is absolutely frightening in its power.

As her love interest, Charles King doesn't fare nearly so well. This is largely due to the fact that his romantic trials & tribulations - involving women other than Miss Love - are of no interest whatsoever and his reaction to them show his character to be both shallow & immature, critical character flaws in a film's hero. King was among MGM's very first musical stars, but his movie career would be very brief, lasting only from 1928 to 1930, for a total of six films.

Playing the stage manager, Jack Benny is the emotional calm point around which the activity swirls. He has very little to do besides move the plot along. His brotherly interest in Miss Love seems platonic and Jack is left out of the film's romantic action.

While not given top billing, Canadian Marie Dressler steals the film as an aging comedienne with too much past. Using her large, homely face & shapeless body to great advantage, she grabs the viewers' attention and never lets go. At this point in her career Dressler was right on the cusp of gaining enormous personal success and within a year she would become Hollywood's biggest star. Even in such a relatively routine role, such as she fills here, Dressler reveals the tremendous heart & common touch which would be the secret to her celebrity. (For an extra chuckle, pay close attention during the opening long shot where the cast sings the last few bars of 'Happy Days' - just to the right of center screen is the Marvelous Marie, swaying across the stage with elephantine grace.)

Appearing as a drunken wardrobe lady, the ubiquitous Polly Moran makes another appearance as Dressler's sidekick. Short, spunky & buxom, Polly was always fun to watch - but never more so than when teamed with Marie.

In a small role, George K. Arthur plays Benny's gynandrous assistant; an important silent comedy star for MGM, this Scottish-born actor would soon sink into talkie anonymity.

It should be noted that the film's original Technicolor sequences - including several songs and the entire conclusion - are now completely missing.


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