6.2/10
175
12 user 3 critic

On with the Show! (1929)

Passed | | Musical, Romance | 13 July 1929 (USA)
A musical advertised as the first 100% natural color, all-singing production. The plot concerns a wide-eyed former hatcheck girl who takes the place of a rebellious star.

Director:

Writers:

(based on the play "Shoestring" by), (scenario)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
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Joe Beaton
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Kitty (as Sally O'Neill)
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Jimmy
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...
Jerry
Harry Gribbon ...
Joe
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Pete
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Durant
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Sam Bloom (as Purnell B. Pratt)
Thomas Jefferson ...
Dad
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Ethel
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Bart
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Storyline

A musical advertised as the first 100% natural color, all-singing production. The plot concerns a wide-eyed former hatcheck girl who takes the place of a rebellious star.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The First 100% Natural Color, Talking, Singing and Dancing Picture. A riot of colors and comedy! More stars than the galaxy! (Print Ad- Syracuse Journal,((Syracuse, NY)) 28 September 1929)

Genres:

Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

13 July 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Comediantes  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

(Vitaphone) (Western Electric Apparatus)

Color:

(2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although this film was produced in two-strip Technicolor, all existing prints are black-and-white. See more »

Connections

Featured in Jazz (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Am I Blue?
(1929) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Akst
Lyrics by Grant Clarke
Performed by Ethel Waters and the Harmony Four Quartette
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User Reviews

Early Warner Bros. musical
30 July 2011 | by See all my reviews

Early Warner Bros. musical, stagy, slow, and mostly of historical interest. The poor quality film available for viewing doesn't help. It's interesting to see how much the movie musical improved between this movie and, for instance, "42nd Street" (also a Warner Bros production) just a few years later. The dialog portions are very static, presumably due to the requirements of early sound pick up systems. However, the result is to bring the action to a halt. The overacting is almost unintentionally laughable. Betty Compson finally has a decent scene near the end of the movie. Arthur Lake is just plain irritating, and I couldn't even warm up to Joe E. Brown. Some of the singers seems to be recorded live, and others poorly dubbed. By far, the most interesting scenes are Ethel Waters singing "Am I Blue", and the quartet of black tap dancers who are unidentified.


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