6.3/10
117
10 user

New York Nights (1929)

A chorus girl with marital woes is pursued by a gangster.

Director:

Writers:

(adaptation), (play) (as Hugh Stanislaws Stange)
Reviews

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Certificate: Passed Comedy | Drama | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A New York tramp (Jolson) falls in love with the mayor's amnesiac girlfriend after rescuing her from a suicide attempt

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Al Jolson, Madge Evans, Frank Morgan
Mammy (1930)
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A love triangle develops in a traveling minstrel troupe.

Director: Michael Curtiz
Stars: Al Jolson, Lois Moran, Lowell Sherman
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

Mayme and sister Janie are salesgirls in Ginsberg's Department Store. Mayme is in love with store clerk Bill, but Janie tries to steal him from her. Hazel, another salesgirl, is Jean Harlow's first credited role.

Director: A. Edward Sutherland
Stars: Clara Bow, Jean Arthur, James Hall
The Racket (1928)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

An honest police captain vows to bring down a powerful bootlegger who is protected by corrupt politicians and judges.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Thomas Meighan, Louis Wolheim, Marie Prevost
Riffraff (1936)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Fisherman Dutch marries cannery worker Hattie. He quits his poorly paid job to concentrate on getting better working conditions as union leader. Unfortunately, the union members disagree ... See full summary »

Director: J. Walter Ruben
Stars: Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Una Merkel
Comedy | Romance | Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Two American soldiers are captured by the Germans on the Western Front during World War One and escape a POW camp only to stumble into further life-threatening adventures when they come across an Arabian king's daughter while on the lam.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: William Boyd, Mary Astor, Louis Wolheim
Rain (1932)
Certificate: Passed Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A prostitute finds redemption in Pago Pago thanks to a hard missionary man.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Joan Crawford, Walter Huston, Fred Howard
Anything Goes (1936)
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

A young man falls in love with a beautiful blonde. When he sees her being forced onto a luxury liner, he decides to follow and rescue her. However, he discovers that she is an English ... See full summary »

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Bing Crosby, Ethel Merman, Charles Ruggles
Action | Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A company of Marines races against the clock to find a Japanese rocket base.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Richard Widmark, Jack Palance, Reginald Gardiner
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Toni Le Brun, a beautiful Viennese singer, becomes the ward of the wardrobe mistress of a Monte Carlo nightclub. Her benefactor, however, is actually a baroness incognito. Toni falls in ... See full summary »

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Corinne Griffith, Louise Dresser, Lowell Sherman
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

An investigative reporter sees an opportunity for the story of a lifetime when an accused murderer escapes hanging.

Director: Lewis Milestone
Stars: Adolphe Menjou, Pat O'Brien, Mary Brian
Fugitives (1929)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  

Nightclub singer Alice Carroll is found in the office of club owner Al Barrow, who is lying dead on the floor. Alice has been overheard threatening to kill Barrow rather than give in to his... See full summary »

Director: William Beaudine
Stars: Madge Bellamy, Don Terry, Arthur Stone
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
... Jill Deverne
... Fred Deverne
... Joe Prividi
... Peggy
... Ruthie Day (as Mary Koran)
... Johnny Dolan
Edit

Storyline

Chorus girl Jill and composer Fred are happily married until he steps out on her with another woman. Tired of his ongoing alcoholism and heartbroken, Jill decides to leave him and live it up, though she must contend with the unwanted advances of a notorious gangster who will stop at nothing to make her his mistress. And when she considers taking Fred back, matters could get deadly fast. Written by cupcakes

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Her First ALL TALKING Picture See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 December 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Noches de Nueva York  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(1938 re-release) | (original)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The party scene in the existing print is missing the cameo by Al Jolson. See more »

Goofs

Before putting a pot of coffee on the stove, Jill uses a wooden match to light the burner, while never once looking at the match. She shakes the match to put it out, but it flares up again as she drops it on top of a cabinet next to the stove. She then puts the coffee pot on the burner and walks off camera to look out the window. See more »

Quotes

Jill Deverne: [Norma Talmadge's first line of spoken dialogue on film - said down a dumbwaiter shaft to who she thinks is the iceman] Twenty-five pounds. And don't give my chunk a twice-over shave.
Joe Prividi: [said up the dumbwaiter shaft after sending up a stolen box of flowers with a note for her birthday] Good morning, Jill.
Jill Deverne: Good morning, Mr. Prividi.
Joe Prividi: Mrs. Deverne, as I wished ya' wasn't.
Jill Deverne: You stop this silly flower business! Do you hear me?
Joe Prividi: Why? It's your boithday, ain' it, huh?
Jill Deverne: Well, who told you to celebrate it?
Joe Prividi: My ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood: End of an Era (1980) See more »

Soundtracks

A Year From Today
(uncredited)
Written by Dave Dreyer, Al Jolson and Ballard MacDonald
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
You must see this Norma Talmadge talkie!
4 November 2002 | by See all my reviews

A police wagon speeds through pre-dawn Manhattan streets as the credits roll. The siren screams, there is no music. Two policemen rouse a doctor to a stricken man, he's dying. "Who did it, Dopie?" Cut to a tuxedoed silk hat in the back of a chauffered limo. "Gee, boss, that was a nervy hit." An I. O. U. for $25,000 payable to Dopie Brown is being torn, "Somebody's always gotta pay for a fourflush." A cackling John Wray (as Joe Prividi) chews the I. O. U. pieces into a spitwad, then flings it out the window. Joe then breaks into a flower shop and takes a stolen bouquet to "his goil".

Norma Talmadge as Jill Deverne is the object of Joe's affections. Leaning into a clever two shot in a dumbwaiter, she reminds her Broadway show's producer that her husband might object. Jill walks the knife edge between offending her benefactor and encouraging his romantic inclinations. She is polite, yet firm. In another room, her husband, Fred (Gilbert Roland) works on a tune with buddy, Johnny (Roscoe Karnes). Fred's stuck for a closing lyric and Jill enters with a plum, then falls into his arms. In one scene, Gilbert Roland and Norma Talmadge exhibit their fine voices and sparkling, well-honed chemistry. Roland and Talmadge had been teamed in THE DOVE (1927) and A WOMAN DISPUTED (1928) and here, the magic pops out of the screen. Norma has several close-ups that display her acting mastery. Halfway through the first reel you'll be in love with this movie.

Lilyan Tashman, as Jill's friend Peggy, has a backstage scene where her beauty is truly revealed. With her hair hidden by a cloche-like headpiece, Ms. Tashman's face is revealed to be the most beautiful ever photographed. Also revealed, in this pre-code picture, is her body. Were it not for the wings of a bird seemingly painted on Lilyan's front, all of her modesty would be lost.

The direction is excellent, tightly handled by Lewis Milestone right before he started ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT. The pace is rapid and only relents for one brief reconciliation between Jill and Fred. They plot their getaway in a booth in a diner. As they hash out the final details, the camera dollies slowly to the next booth, chillingly revealing Joe's chauffer eavesdropping.

Ray June keeps interesting shots coming throughout the 64 minutes my print ran. And this is where a discrepency arises. The runtime is given as 108 minutes (IMBD), then a release footage of (approx.) 7380 ft (IMDB). AFI lists the release footage at 7447. As both footages run 81 or 82 mins, one wonders what happened to the rest of the film. [I know film shrinks, but that's rediculous] I can find only evidence of one song ever having been in the picture.

73 years after its release, it is impossible to determine what sank this wonderful film at the box office. But, sank it did. Impossible to ascertain whether it failed to be promoted, what the rumor mill ground out or just how the public expected silent film stars to sound. After one more picture, the glittering career of Norma Talmadge, a star that shone so bright as to bring two sisters into the arc light, would be extinguished. Only a year later, as writer Joseph L. Mankiewicz noted, the end of the silent era was typified by Norma Talmadge leaving the Brown Derby and telling a gang of autograph hounds, "Get away, you little b*****ds, I don't need you anymore." And thus fell silent a splendid, promising new talking picture career.

At least we have this terrific movie to remind us of how good silent film technique could be in talkies.


16 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 10 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed