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Coquette (1929)

Unrated | | Drama, Romance | 6 April 1929 (USA)
A flirtatious Southern belle is compromised with one of her suitors.

Director:

Sam Taylor

Writers:

George Abbott (based on the stage production by), Ann Preston Bridgers (based on the stage production by) | 3 more credits »
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Won 1 Oscar. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Mary Pickford ... Norma Besant
Johnny Mack Brown ... Michael Jeffery (as John Mack Brown)
Matt Moore ... Stanley Wentworth
John St. Polis ... Dr. John Besant
William Janney ... Jimmy Besant
Henry Kolker ... Jasper Carter
George Irving ... Robert Wentworth
Louise Beavers ... Julia
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Storyline

Norma Besant, daughter of a Southern doctor, is an incorrigible flirt and has many boys on her string. She begins to favor Michael Jeffrey, who, shiftless and hot-tempered but fundamentally honorable, is warned off by her father. When Michael returns after a long absence, the pair are innocently compromised, and Dr. Besant's old-South paternal rage brings tragedy. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

100% Talking Picture See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 April 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Coqueta See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$489,106 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$1,400,000, 31 December 1929
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Pickford Corporation See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (MovieTone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A news item in International Photographer from February, 1929, appears to list Alvin Wyckoff as this film's co-cinematographer, along with Karl Struss. Struss received sole billing in the final film. See more »

Quotes

Stanley Wentworth: Why don't you marry me, Norma?
Norma Besant: Stanley, you're a dear.
Stanley Wentworth: Oh, I know you've heard it so often it's beginning to sound like an echo. But, I do, so, mean it.
See more »

Connections

Featured in The 40th Annual Academy Awards (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

NOBODY KNOWS DE TROUBLE I'VE SEEN
(uncredited)
Traditional spiritual
Arranged by Henry Thacker Burleigh (1917)
Sung in part by uncredited actor
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Much maligned film is actually quite charming.
13 December 1999 | by David-240See all my reviews

Mary Pickford won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in this film - and this fact has dominated the way people have treated it over the years. Yes, perhaps her award had more to do with her power than her performance - but the performance is actually pretty good. At times she rises to great emotional heights - the death scene is quite extraordinary and the court-room sequence powerful. Of course she's too old for the role - but she was too old for nearly every part she ever played, and just a few years later Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer played Romeo and Juliet to great acclaim - so such age issues were probably not issues in 1929.

It is true that she talks a little like an adult Shirley Temple (did Shirley model herself on Mary - they certainly played many of the same roles?)- but her silent acting is excellent - her looks can really kill.

The supporting cast is not very good, except for the wonderful Louise Beavers, - but Johnny Mack Brown is devastatingly handsome as Mary's love interest. The script betrays its stage origins, and the film suffers the same problems most early talkies suffer - inadequate use of music, poorly synchronised sound effects, completely absent sound effects (eg doors opening and closing silently), and limited movement of both actors and camera.

But all things considered this is a worthwhile little film - certainly not great but not as bad as myth would have it. And the ending is really gorgeous. Watching the great silent stars struggling in early talkies, I always feel that they were learning a new craft, just as the cameramen, directors and writers were. Sadly the audiences were less forgiving of their beloved stars than they were of those unseen behind the camera, and rejected them before they had a chance to develop a new acting technique. I can't help thinking that, if they had been given the chance, many of these actors would have been great talkie actors. The technicians were allowed to develop but, by the time they were skilled enough to make the actors look and sound good, most of the old stars had gone. The supreme example of a silent star who was allowed to develop is, of course, Garbo - and, to a lesser extent, Ramon Novarro (but he could sing - which helped). Is it possible that, given the same opportunities as Garbo, we may have seen Fairbanks, Pickford, Talmadge, Swanson, Bow, Brooks, Gish, Gilbert, Colleen Moore, Leatrice Joy etc for many more years than we were allowed? But within ten years of this film being made Gilbert and Fairbanks were dead, Gish was carving out a new career on the stage, Pickford, Swanson, Bow, Talmadge, Brooks and Moore had retired, Joy was doing the occasional character role and even Ramon Novarro was out of work. What a waste!


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