5.7/10
6,584
87 user 41 critic

The Broadway Melody (1929)

Passed | | Drama, Musical, Romance | 6 June 1929 (USA)
A pair of sisters from the vaudeville circuit try to make it big time on Broadway, but matters of the heart complicate the attempt.

Director:

Harry Beaumont

Writers:

Edmund Goulding (story), Norman Houston (dialogue) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charles King ... Eddie Kearns
Anita Page ... Queenie Mahoney
Bessie Love ... Harriet 'Hank' Mahoney
Edit

Storyline

Hank and Queenie Mahoney, a vaudeville act, come to Broadway, where their friend Eddie Kerns needs them for his number in one of Francis Zanfield's shows. Eddie was in love with Hank, but when he meets Queenie, he falls in love to her, but she is courted by Jock Warriner, a member of the New Yorker high society. It takes a while till Queenie recognizes, that she is for Jock nothing more than a toy, and it also takes a while till Hank recognizes that Eddie is in love with Queenie. Written by Stephan Eichenberg <eichenbe@fak-cbg.tu-muenchen.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You can't compare this picture with any other! It stands alone as the supreme triumph of the Talking and Singing Screen! (Print Ad- Philadelphia Inquirer, ((Philadelphia, Penna.)) 20 April 1929) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The first film to win Best Picture without winning any other Academy Awards. Only two other movies have done this: Grand Hotel (1932) and Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). See more »

Goofs

The guitar player in the song "Broadway Melody" cannot be heard playing until he tilts his guitar slightly (possibly towards the mic). See more »

Quotes

Hank Mahoney: Oh, honey, with your looks and my ability, Oh, I wouldn't steer you wrong. Oh, now, don't worry. You see that electric sign with the fella in BVDs?
Queenie Mahoney: Yeah.
Hank Mahoney: Well, right there, they're going to have the Mahoney Sisters.
Queenie Mahoney: In BVDs?
Hank Mahoney: Yes, in BVD - Baby, they were plenty smart when they made you beautiful.
See more »

Alternate Versions

The "Wedding of the Painted Doll" musical sequence was originally presented in Technicolor. All color prints of this sequence are lost, so later reissues and DVD release present the sequence in black and white. See more »

Connections

Featured in Broadway: The American Musical (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Give My Regards to Broadway
(1904) (uncredited)
Written by George M. Cohan
In the score for the first scene
See more »

User Reviews

 
Not the worst Best Picture
15 March 2006 | by QanqorSee all my reviews

OK, it's very simple. If you want to watch and enjoy this film, you have to put yourself back into 1929. If you're not willing to do that, don't waste your time. If you *are* willing to do that, it's a pretty good film. If the sound or picture seems ancient-- well, not in 1929! If the plot seems old hat-- well, not in 1929! You really do have to put yourself mentally into the time-frame of the time. This was really pretty damn good for 1929.

Of course, part of the enjoyment, today, of watching such a film, is indeed the time-warp you get. It really is interesting to see the movie people groping to find their way in the new era of talkies. Some have mentioned the odd silent-movie-style story-boards that open the scenes. Or the way that the players sometimes get out of focus when they get out of range of the camera. There were some other limitations of the time that I found interesting. Very interesting to note all the silence, when the characters are not speaking, especially when they are just emoting. Today, of course, every such scene would have orchestral back-up music, to tell you how to feel, but obviously nobody had thought of that yet. Or the way that they hadn't really invented the modern notion of a Musical, where people burst into song for no reason. In the one scene here where somebody seems to spontaneously burst into a song describing his feelings to someone else... at the end of the song he explains that he wrote it just for her (thus, it wasn't spontaneous after all).

All in all, not a *great* film, but enjoyable. I gave it six stars, plus an extra one for the historic interest. My one real gripe: I did think that the actress who played Queenie was just terrible. Too often she just didn't sound natural, she sounded like she was reading lines.


31 of 42 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 87 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 June 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Broadway Melody of 1929 See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$379,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(TCM print)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)| Silent

Color:

Black and White | Color (one sequence)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed