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Riley the Cop (1928)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama | 25 November 1928 (USA)
Joe Smith, a young bakery worker, gets engaged to Mary Coronelli, who comes from a wealthy family. Her snooty aunt takes Mary to Europe, hoping to break up the couple, but Joe uses his ... See full summary »

Director:

John Ford (uncredited)

Writers:

Fred Stanley (story and scenario), James Gruen (story and scenario)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
J. Farrell MacDonald ... James 'Aloysius' Riley (as Farrell Macdonald)
Nancy Drexel ... Mary Coronelli
David Rollins ... David 'Davy' Collins
Louise Fazenda ... Lena Krausmeyer
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Storyline

Joe Smith, a young bakery worker, gets engaged to Mary Coronelli, who comes from a wealthy family. Her snooty aunt takes Mary to Europe, hoping to break up the couple, but Joe uses his savings to follow her there. Unfortunately, he is falsely accused of embezzling money for the trip from the bakery, and Officer Riley, a well-liked local cop, pursues Joe to Europe. While in Germany Riley falls for a young flapper in a beer garden, but he's in for a surprise when he finds out who she really is. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

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Taglines:

A sparkling, bubbling infectious comedy that will send you home chuckling and will keep you chuckling for weeks-with a love story entwined and adventures that will take your breath away. (Print Ad- Sunday Herald, ((Provo, Utah)) 9 December 1928) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Alternate Versions

Fox also released this movie without a soundtrack, with a film length of 1826.67 m. See more »

User Reviews

an interesting early example of Ford's view of ethnicity
1 September 1999 | by Abe-22See all my reviews

Ford was long accused of racism in his films, particularly in his westerns. I have seen several of his silent films (courtesy of AMC's recent festival of Ford films) and would argue that while Ford held stereotypical views of ethnicity and race, he was not a racist. Consider that early in "Riley the Cop" there is a group of children playing on Riley's beat that includes two black children who seem to be on equal footing with the others. Riley visits a young black woman who works as a cook in a house, where he takes a break from his beat and seems unconcerned about the cook's race. The bootblack is a stereotype, but hardly an unusual occupation for blacks in a city.

Riley himself is the stereotypical Irish cop, found in abundance in these early films, such as "The Shamrock Handicap." Since Ford was himself Irish, he seems to be having fun with the ethnicity, and extends a good-natured poke at German and French police officers to suggest a universal brotherhood among policemen. Given that just a dozen years before this film was made, the Germans were the mortal enemies of the Allies in the Great War, everyone here seems to be getting along pretty well.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

None

Release Date:

25 November 1928 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Akage nunokoi no uzumaki See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Fox Film Corporation See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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