Red Hair (1928) - News Poster

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Frederica Sagor Maas, 1900 - 2012

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"Frederica Sagor Maas, a pioneering female screenwriter who scored her first big success with The Plastic Age, a smash hit for 'It Girl' Clara Bow in 1925, died Jan 5." She was 111. Mike Barnes in the Hollywood Reporter: "Because she was a woman, Maas was typically assigned work on flapper comedies and light dramas. Her efforts includes such other Bow films as Dance Madness (1926), Hula (1927) and Red Hair (1928); two films featuring Norma Shearer, His Secretary (1925) and The Waning Sex (1926); the Greta Garbo drama Flesh and the Devil (1926); and the Louise Brooks film Rolled Stockings (1927)…. In 1927, she married Ernest Maas, a producer at Fox, and they wrote as a team but struggled to sell scripts…. The pair, interrogated by the FBI for allegedly Communist activities, were out of the business by the early 1950s. Ernest Mass died in 1986 at age 94. In 1999, at the urging of film historian Kevin Brownlow, Maas published her autobiography,
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Silent Film Era Screenwriter Dies at Age 111

Frederica Sagor Maas, a pioneering female screenwriters who scored her first big success with The Plastic Age, a smash hit for “It Girl” Clara Bow in 1925, died Jan. 5 in the San Diego suburb of La Mesa, Calif. She was 111. One of the last surviving personalities from the silent film era, Maas spent her last decade in a health care center. Because she was a woman, Maas was typically assigned work on flapper comedies and light dramas. Her efforts includes such other Bow films as Dance Madness (1926), Hula (1927) and Red Hair (1928); two films featuring Norma

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Oscar Winner Emil Jannings, Theda Bara, Lon Chaney, Clara Bow in Color: Fragments on TCM

Emil Jannings in Victor Fleming's The Way of All Flesh The final reel of John Ford’s The Village Blacksmith (1922), featuring Virginia Valli; Best Actor Oscar winner Emil Jannings in The Way of All Flesh (1927); screen legends Douglas Fairbanks in He Comes Up Smiling (1918), Theda Bara in Cleopatra (1917), and Lon Chaney in The Miracle Man (1919); the early sound, Technicolor musical Gold Diggers of Broadway (1929); and the only color footage of Clara Bow — in Red Hair (1928). All that and more in the Flicker Alley-produced Fragments: Surviving Pieces of Lost Films, a two-hour documentary featuring remaining bits and pieces from "lost films" that will be shown on Turner Classic Movies at 5 p.m. Pt. That's a great chance to look at some rare footage that until quite recently had been available only at places such as the UCLA Film & Television Archives, the Library of Congress, or [...]
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