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The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

La passion de Jeanne d'Arc (original title)
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In 1431, Jeanne d'Arc is placed on trial on charges of heresy. The ecclesiastical jurists attempt to force Jeanne to recant her claims of holy visions.

Director:

Carl Theodor Dreyer (as Carl Th. Dreyer)
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Top Rated Movies #226 | 5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Maria Falconetti ... Jeanne d'Arc (as Melle Falconetti)
Eugene Silvain ... Évêque Pierre Cauchon (Bishop Pierre Cauchon) (as Eugène Silvain)
André Berley ... Jean d'Estivet
Maurice Schutz ... Nicolas Loyseleur
Antonin Artaud ... Jean Massieu
Michel Simon ... Jean Lemaître
Jean d'Yd Jean d'Yd ... Guillaume Evrard
Louis Ravet Louis Ravet ... Jean Beaupère (as Ravet)
Armand Lurville Armand Lurville ... Juge (Judge) (as André Lurville)
Jacques Arnna Jacques Arnna ... Juge (Judge)
Alexandre Mihalesco ... Juge (Judge)
Léon Larive Léon Larive ... Juge (Judge)
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Storyline

Giovanna is taken to the Inquisition court. . After the accusation of blasphemy continues to pray in ecstasy . A friar thinks that Giovanna is a saint, but is taken away by the soldiers. Giovanna sees a cross in the shadow and feels comforted. She is not considered a daughter of God but a daughter of the devil and is sentenced to torture. Giovanna D 'Arco says that even if she dies she will not deny anything. The eyes are twisted by terror in front of the torture wheel and faint. Giovanna is taken to a bed where they are bleeding. Giovanna feels that she is about to die and asks to be buried in a consecrated area. Giovanna burns at the stake while devoted ladies cry. Written by luigicavaliere

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

JOAN of ARC PICTURES Inc. presents See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Maria Falconetti's second and final film role. See more »

Goofs

Jean's hair is cut with a shiny pair of scissors which appears to be from the 20th century. Pivoted scissors (the kind with finger holes in use today) were not commonly available until the 18th century. Spring-based scissors which are squeezed from the ends (kind of like tongs) were used in the middle ages and were usually made of iron, not steel. See more »

Quotes

Évêque Pierre Cauchon (Bishop Pierre Cauchon): How do you know a good angel from an evil angel?
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Alternate Versions

In 1981 a print was discovered in a closet of a mental institution in Oslo, Norway. The film was sent to the Norwegian Film Institute where it was found to be a copy of the original 1928 version with Danish intertitles. Uncensored prints were shipped to Copenhagen, and were not censored there, making the discovered print the defining version. See more »

Connections

Featured in Sunset Boulevards (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Voices of Light
Written by Richard Einhorn
The score used in the 1995 version
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User Reviews

 
When viewing it we look at it as looking in a mirror.
27 December 2004 | by GulyJimsonSee all my reviews

What can one say about this work of art that has not been said many times before by those far better qualified to explain both it's importance and place as cinema and art? I shall not comment on the greatness of the film's technical achievements; the stunning cinematography, the production design, the brilliance of the screenplay based on actual transcripts from the trial, or the perfection of Mr. Dreyer's direction. The performance of Falconetti as Jeanne d' Arc has a profundity and depth far beyond my ability to illuminate. I suppose the best I can hope to do is to share my feelings, however inadequately expressed, of the effect it had on me. To say that it may be the greatest film ever made is to sound both obvious and trite. That a work of such beauty and simplicity, made seventy-six years ago can still have the power to move audiences in an era of multi-million dollar, hi-tech, bombastic over-wrought cinematic drivel is in itself a testament to the vision and genius of Carl Theodor Dreyer, Maria Falconetti and their collaborators. It is nourishment for those that hunger for something more in cinema, a feast for the soul. It is a reminder that film can indeed be art, and this film like all great works of art, lifts and transports us from the routine of our work-a-day lives to enable us, if only for a moment to experience the sublime. When viewing it we look at it as looking in a mirror. That is to say we look into ourselves. We question ourselves as to our own beliefs, or the lack thereof and the strength of spirit that enables an individual to endure the unendurable. Viewing it is a profound experience the nature of which for myself is transcendent rather than religious, because I am not in the least a religious person. Transcendent because it evokes emotions and thoughts that I cannot wholly account for, or adequately explain.

"La Passion of Jeanne d'Arc" is stark, radiant, exalted, simple, (but never simplistic), and ultimately sublime. The rest is silence.


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Details

Country:

France

Language:

None | French

Release Date:

25 October 1928 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Passion of Joan of Arc See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,408, 26 November 2017

Gross USA:

$21,877

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$21,877
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1952 re-release) | (restored DVD) | (DVD) | (Blu-ray) | (synchronized sound reissue)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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