Two young men, one rich, one middle class, who are in love with the same woman, become fighter pilots in World War I.

Directors:

William A. Wellman, Harry d'Abbadie d'Arrast (uncredited)

Writers:

John Monk Saunders (story), Hope Loring (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
2,296 ( 1,477)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Clara Bow ... Mary Preston
Charles 'Buddy' Rogers ... Jack Powell (as Charles Rogers)
Richard Arlen ... David Armstrong
Jobyna Ralston ... Sylvia Lewis
El Brendel ... Herman Schwimpf
Richard Tucker ... Air Commander
Gary Cooper ... Cadet White
Gunboat Smith ... The Sergeant
Henry B. Walthall ... David's Father
Roscoe Karns ... Lt. Cameron
Julia Swayne Gordon ... David's Mother
Arlette Marchal ... Celeste
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Rod Rogers Rod Rogers ... Aviator
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Storyline

Two young men from the same town but different social classes end up as fighter pilots in WW1. Jack Preston is a keen auto mechanic, building and modifying cars. David Armstrong comes from a wealthy family. They are both in love with the same woman, Sylvia. Her heart belongs to David but she doesn't let Jack know and plays along with his infatuation. Meanwhile, Jack's neighbour, Mary, is deeply in love with him but he just views her as a friend. WW1 interrupts the romantic entanglements as Jack and David enlist in the US Army Air Service (Air Service of the AEF at the time). They are initially bitter enemies, due to them both vying for Sylvia's affections. Over time, however, they become very good friends. They are both posted to the same fighter squadron in France, where being a fighter pilot means every day could easily be your last. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

An Epic of the Air See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War | Action

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for war violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to biographer David Stenn, Clara Bow did not like her military uniform, as it did not show off her figure. She kept fighting with the costumers to let her wear a tight belt and show off her curves. See more »

Goofs

When Mary paints the star on the driver's side of Jack's car, the right point of the star is imperfect as she throws the brush to the ground. When Jack turns around to see the design, it is perfectly done. Jack then walks to the front of the car and as Mary leans on it, you can partially see on the upper left hood that the same designed is already painted on the passenger's side. See more »

Quotes

John "Jack" Powell: [drunkenly] Li'l Bubbles... I'm gonna kiss you!
[puts his forefinger up next to Mary's lips, she closes her eyes, opens her lips, and swoons]
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Alternate Versions

For opening "roadshow" engagements, some of the battle scenes were shown in color, and half the film was screened in Magnascope (a forerunner to modern widescreen processes). Roadshow presentations also included an overture, intermission, and entr'acte music, all of which were dropped for the general release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in You Bet Your Life: Episode #6.12 (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

Mam'selle Caprice
(credited on 2012 restored score only)
Written by Maurice Baron
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User Reviews

All set (hopefully for DVD)?
7 April 2004 | by DrezenMediaSee all my reviews

This film is, no doubt, a timeless triumph of the silent cinema. I first saw it three years ago and have seen it at least 30 times since then. I've only looked back to see that I have it in my collection...but not on DVD! These studios need to start thinking back to the days in which movies as good as these were made and stop producing so much garbage that they think will make tons of money without considering whether it's done right or not. This film taught me just how important gesture and body language can be in the acting world, whether it be on film or on stage. I know just how "in-character" an actor is just by looking at their face, their eyes, and how they're written in the script. Don't get me wrong, people can overact and underact in certain parts, but if you do anything without considering your character's expression or mood, regardless of whether or not your voice is unbearable to hear, you will never see success past the sound of crickets hiding in the audience. The industry knew that sound was coming. Most didn't accept this truth, but they knew it alright! "Wings" reminds those who've seen it, as with most classics of the silent cinema, that ACTIONS SPEAK A MUCH GREATER VOLUME THAN THE SPOKEN WORD. I've said all I need to say, and now I'll let this picture speak for itself.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 January 1929 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Wings See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$746
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System) (musical score and sound effects)| Silent | Dolby Digital (2012 restoration edition)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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