7.3/10
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17 user 13 critic

The End of St. Petersburg (1927)

Konets Sankt-Peterburga (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama | 30 May 1928 (USA)
A peasant comes to St. Petersburg to find work. He unwittingly helps in the arrest of an old friend who is now a labor leader. The unemployed man is arrested and sent to fight in World War I. After three years, he returns to rebel.

Directors:

Vsevolod Pudovkin, Mikhail Doller (co-director)

Writer:

Nathan Zarkhi
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Cast

Credited cast:
Aleksandr Chistyakov ... A worker
Vera Baranovskaya ... His wife
Ivan Chuvelyov ... Peasant boy
V. Obolensky V. Obolensky ... Lebedev
Sergey Komarov ... His employer
Viktor Tsoppi Viktor Tsoppi ... Patriot
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Aleksei Davor Aleksei Davor
Vladimir Fogel ... German Officer
Aleksandr Gromov Aleksandr Gromov ... Revolutionary (as A. Gromov)
Nikolay Khmelyov
Vsevolod Pudovkin ... German Officer
Max Tereshkovich Max Tereshkovich
M. Tsybulsky M. Tsybulsky
Anna Zemtsova Anna Zemtsova
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Storyline

A peasant comes to St. Petersburg to find work. He unwittingly helps in the arrest of an old friend who is now a labor leader. The unemployed man is arrested and sent to fight in World War I. After three years, he returns to rebel.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Russia's Greatest Screen Achievement (Print Ad- Philadelphia Inquirer, ((Philadelphia, Penna.)) 9 November 1928) See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vsevolod Pudovkin: The German officer. See more »

User Reviews

 
Starts slow, but continuously builds
19 September 2015 | by vladislavmanoyloSee all my reviews

This films editing style lends, which can jarringly cut between shots with little regard to space and time, itself well to scenes with lots of tension or aggression. This makes the majority of the movie very intense by using images transitions to convey emotion, but the early parts suffer for it. Noticeable emphasis is placed on the angles and content of shots to convey mood, which frequently works as an effective metaphor in the narrative. But before the story is set up, the meaning of many juxtaposed shots floats away without having another element in the story to meaningfully attach to.

I think too much time is spent early in the film on imagery the film deemed important, instead of offering context for the imagery. But after that it is quite enjoyable to watch. Montage used as metaphor relies heavily on a common ground between the language of images a film uses and the audiences understanding of them. But the impression and transition between images itself can enhance pacing and tension, and this greatly improves the movie. In particular the scenes where the younger protagonist attacks his employer is very powerful. In fact the content of the film after that point is enough to justify watching it. It takes characters to make a story enjoyable, and the film becomes aware of this and uses its editing to enhance the characters.


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Details

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

None

Release Date:

30 May 1928 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The End of St. Petersburg See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Mezhrabpom-Rus See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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