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College (1927)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Sport | November 1927 (USA)
To reconcile with his girlfriend, a bookish college student tries to become an athlete.

Directors:

James W. Horne, Buster Keaton (uncredited)

Writers:

Carl Harbaugh (story), Bryan Foy (story)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Buster Keaton ... A Son
Anne Cornwall ... The Girl
Flora Bramley Flora Bramley ... Her Friend
Harold Goodwin ... A Rival
Snitz Edwards ... The Dean
Carl Harbaugh ... Crew Coach
Sam Crawford Sam Crawford ... Baseball Coach
Florence Turner ... A Mother
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Storyline

Ronald's high school valedictory address praises books and condemns sports. His girlfriend Mary condemns his attitude. He fears losing her to rival Jeff, decides to go to college and pay more attention to sports. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

HE TAKES THE COURSES YOU TAKE THE LAUGHS (Print ad- Crawfordsville Review, ((Crawfordsville, Ind.)) 3 January 1928) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Sport

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The boat for which Buster Keaton is coxswain is called Damfino, the same name as the eponymous boat in his short movie The Boat (1921). See more »

Quotes

The Girl: Your speech was ridiculous. Anyone prefers an athlete to a weak-kneed, teacher's pet. When you change your mind about athletes, then I'll change my mind about you.
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Connections

Featured in Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

The Entertainer
written by Scott Joplin
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User Reviews

 
Keaton's Interesting Achievement
30 December 2012 | by marcin_kukuczkaSee all my reviews

"In films that combined comedy with extraordinary physical risks, Buster Keaton played a brave spirit who took the universe on its own terms, and gave no quarter" (Roger Ebert)

Among many silent movies which we are lucky to see these days (and which have not been lost after all), COLLEGE by James W. Horne and Buster Keaton was a real surprise for the audiences in my town's movie theater. Seeing silent comedies on the big screen exceptionally proves to be an uncommon experience. I think that there are hardly any viewers who may leave the cinema disappointed. Simply because the humor of COLLEGE seems to have stood a test of time combining comedy features with some notions of what a good movie entertainment is all about. What is it about?

It is to amuse us, to bring relief, to educate a bit being at the same time not too tense. Roger Ebert, in the quotations that marks the beginning of my review, nicely observes that Keaton was able to execute tremendous physical abilities, which makes his films interesting even today. That is particularly noticeable in COLLEGE and calls our attention throughout. His character of young Ronald who does anything to make himself attractive to Mary (Anne Cornwall), the girl he loves, executes much of timeless humor. Combined with wit, the effect is outstanding: awe and laughter go in pairs and substitute each other. Who can forget the hilarious scenes on the sports field? How can you remain indifferent to his efforts? A lot of such moments when he moves like a true athlete do not allow you to concentrate elsewhere. That makes COLLEGE vibrant and surprising.

Keaton's character is quite different than Charlie Chaplin's roles. He is quite a flamboyant young man who makes us laugh but ALSO makes us identify with his dilemma. Just to note what there is at the heart of his efforts: to win the heart of his 'sweetheart.' Consider the scenes with his mother (Florence Turner) when the humor is somehow directed towards his umbrella but also supplied with a clue of such a young man's personality, his dealing with the world and his dealing with simple situations. When he is in the arms of his Mary at last (the moment that he reaches thanks to extraordinary pains taken), it is a truly genuine moment, a moment of a dream fulfilled...expressed in the face of a performer.

Among the supporting cast, Snitz Edwards is fabulously funny as the Dean, the old bachelor who only claims to be indifferent to a woman's love.

To draw a humorous conclusion, COLLEGE is a light hearted entertainment which, though it is silent, does not let you resort to silence. Having seen it, you still feel a desire to share your thoughts with other people. A gem of its time!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

None | English

Release Date:

November 1927 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

College See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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