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The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Mystery | 14 February 1927 (UK)
A landlady suspects her new lodger is the madman killing women in London.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Marie Belloc Lowndes (from the novel by) (as Mrs. Belloc Lowndes), Eliot Stannard (scenario)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Marie Ault ... The Landlady
Arthur Chesney Arthur Chesney ... Her Husband
June Tripp ... Daisy - A Mannequin (as June)
Malcolm Keen ... Joe - A Police Detective
Ivor Novello ... The Lodger
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Storyline

A serial killer known as "The Avenger" is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting's daughter is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the avenger. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

For the opening scene, where the Avenger's murder victim faces the camera and screams, Sir Alfred Hitchcock filmed the scene by having the actress lie down on a large sheet of glass, with her golden hair spread out around her head. He then lit the actress from underneath the sheet of glass, and filmed her with a camera mounted on its side, with the lens pointed at a downward angle. This gave the appearance that her hair (with its golden curls, so important to the murderer) was ringed in a halo of light. See more »

Goofs

When the lodger is playing a game of chess with Daisy (about 26 minutes into the movie), the chessboard is set up incorrectly. A game of chess is always played with a black square on the far-left and a white square on the far-right of the board as they face it; on this occasion the board is the wrong way around and should be rotated 90 degrees in either direction for it to be correct. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Female eyewitness: Tall he was - and his face all wrapped up.
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Crazy Credits

Closing credits: Thank you to everyone who supported the BFI's Silent Hitchcock restoration project. See more »

Alternate Versions

An earlier version broadcast on the AMC Channel (before commercials were part of their format) had a 74-minute print from the National Film Archive Collection and contained an unidentified orchestral score. See more »

Connections

Featured in Cinema Europe: The Other Hollywood (1995) See more »

User Reviews

 
A Story Of The London Fog
28 July 2004 | by Ron OliverSee all my reviews

With a savage murderer stalking the night, dark suspicion swirls about THE LODGER living in a London home.

Sir Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980) became a director of note with this silent film, his first thriller and only his third directorial effort, which shows the young Master's talents being developed in embryo. Based on the novel by Mrs. Belloc Lowndes and the tales of Jack the Ripper, Hitchcock was able to embroider upon the theme of mistaken identities and incorporate an intense chase sequence, both of which would become important elements in his later suspense films. He also made the first of his famous cameo appearances, twice actually, which would also become part of his trademark.

The film is well plotted and moody, told in an almost expressionistic style, relying mainly on visuals and a somewhat frugal use of title cards. The staging in the narrow, multi-level home is especially well managed, with characters on different stories interacting in the plot simultaneously.

Fans of the 1944 American remake with Laird Cregar may be surprised at its very different ending from this film. This is probably largely due to the fact that the earlier movie (including some very incongruous and never explained plot elements) was planned as a showcase for its star, matinée idol Ivor Novello, who plays the title role. Born David Ivor Davies in Wales, Novello (1893-1951) was the son of famed singing teacher Dame Clara Novello Davies. He found success on the stage at an early age and became a very popular actor-manager, playwright & composer, his most lauded song being the World War One patriotic tune 'Keep The Home Fires Burning.' Although he appeared occasionally in films, Novello's greatest renown came from his acting in the lavishly romantic stage plays he authored, his handsome good looks being especially appreciated by the ladies in the audience. A hint of his melodramatic stage persona, especially the use of his mesmeric eyes, can be seen in Hitchcock's film, projecting the actor into a virtual Epiphany during the most exciting sequence. Novello would also star in THE LODGER's 1932 British talkie remake.

The rest of the cast does well in support of Novello, especially Marie Ault & Arthur Chesney as his increasingly frightened landlords. Monosyllabic actress June flounces prettily as their flirtatious daughter; Malcolm Keen, whose character is done rather dirty by the script, plays the suspicious cop who loves her.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

None

Release Date:

14 February 1927 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

The Lodger See more »

Filming Locations:

Islington, London, England, UK

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP12,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$83,260
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (National Film Archive print) | (TCM print) | (video) | (Ontario) | (2012) (theatrical) | (2012 restoration)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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