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Dancing Mothers (1926) Poster

Trivia

Prints of this film--at 65 minutes--are held by the Library of Congress and the UCLA Film and Television Archives.
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Actress and Clara Bow contemporary Louise Brooks became a lifelong fan of Clara's, after watching this film in 1926. Fifty years later she declared, "She was absolutely a sensation in 'Dancing Mothers'. Everybody forgot Alice Joyce, because Clara was so marvelous; she just swept the country! I thought she was oh, so wonderful; everybody did. She became a star overnight with nobody's help."
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This marks the Paramount Pictures debut of Clara Bow. She was chosen for the role of Katherine "Kittens" Westcourt after the studio's first choice, Betty Bronson, was rejected after several screen tests; director Herbert Brenon stated that "when she tried to be sexy, she looked like a little girl that wanted to go to the bathroom."
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This was based on the 1924 Broadway play of the same name; it was still being performed in late 1925 when the film itself went into production. Clara Bow viewed the play before filming began and totally reinterpreted her role as Katherine "Kittens" Westcourt, according to Clara Bow biographer David Stenn.
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Following the successful telecasts of Othello (1922) and The Eagle (1925), New York City's WJZ (Channel 7) began a weekly series of Sunday-evening silent film feature presentations, shown more or less in their entirety, which aired intermittently for the next 12 months. This feature was initially broadcast Sunday 7 November 1948, and, like the rest of the series, aired simultaneously on sister stations WFIL (Channel 6) (Philadelphia) and freshly launched WAAM (Channel 13) (Baltimore), an innovation at the time; the following week's selection would be The Coming of Amos (1925).
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