After a car wreck on the winding Mulholland Drive renders a woman amnesiac, she and a perky Hollywood-hopeful search for clues and answers across Los Angeles in a twisting venture beyond dreams and reality.

Director:

David Lynch

Writer:

David Lynch
Popularity
547 ( 1)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 49 wins & 60 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Naomi Watts ... Betty / Diane Selwyn
Jeanne Bates ... Irene
Dan Birnbaum ... Irene's Companion
Laura Harring ... Rita / Camilla Rhodes (as Laura Elena Harring)
Randall Wulff Randall Wulff ... Limo Driver (as Scott Wulff)
Robert Forster ... Detective McKnight
Brent Briscoe ... Detective Domgaard
Maya Bond Maya Bond ... Aunt Ruth
Patrick Fischler ... Dan
Michael Cooke ... Herb
Bonnie Aarons ... Bum
Michael J. Anderson ... Mr. Roque
Joseph Kearney ... Roque's Manservant
Enrique Buelna ... Back of Head Man
Richard Mead Richard Mead ... Hairy-Armed Man
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Storyline

Still untarnished by the false promises of the rapacious film industry, the wide-eyed actress, Betty, sets foot on bustling, sun-kissed Hollywood. Brimming with hope, and eager to spread her wings and prove her worth, Betty moves in Aunt Ruth's expensive apartment, unbeknownst to her, however, that fate has other plans in store for her, setting the stage for life-altering experiences with the unexpected, the indecipherable, and the unknown. Now, in the centre of an elaborate labyrinth of half-truths, faded memories, unrequited loves, and dangerous encounters with the city's ugly face lies a strange key to a mysterious keyhole, an even stranger indigo-blue cube, the young director, Adam, and one cryptic woman: the amnesiac brunette and devilishly seductive car-crash survivor, Rita. But, time flies and Rita's opaque past demands answers. After all, both women deserve the truth. What is the secret of the serpentine, dream-crushing Mulholland Drive? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Love Story In The City Of Dreams See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and some strong sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the 14th film nominated in the Academy Award category for Best Director but no other categories, after Sorrell and Son (1927), Speedy (1928), Two Arabian Knights (1927), Drag (1929), Weary River (1929), Hallelujah (1929), The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958), Woman in the Dunes (1964), Alice's Restaurant (1969), Fellini Satyricon (1969), Blue Velvet (1986), The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), and Short Cuts (1993). See more »

Goofs

When Betty arrives at LA she is walking out from the top level of LAX. Arrivals are at the bottom level, Departures are at the top. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Rita: What are you doing? We don't stop here.
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Crazy Credits

The only time we see the full title spelled out is at the end of the end credits. During the opening credits, there is only a street sign that says "Mulholland Dr". See more »

Alternate Versions

The theatrical version contains 26 minutes of newly shot and restored footage; the TV version of Mullholand Drive, shot in 1999, originally ran at just over 100 minutes and ended at Betty's apartment after helping Rita cut her hair and put a blond wig on; an additional deleted scene had Betty running out of the apartment to the roof where Rita joined her and both of them looking out over Los Angeles where Betty says "I have arrived" and Rita saying the same. The final shot in the TV pilot version has the mysterious bum sitting in the alley behind Winkie's Restaurant and holding the mysterious blue box. New footage shot for the theatrical version includes:
  • The theatrical ending where David Lynch goes back and tells the story of Diane; in the TV pilot, it ends where Rita (Camilla) opens the mysterious blue box.
  • An additional 6 minutes of expanded 'reshoots' that Studio Canal had David Lynch shoot for the theatrical release.
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Connections

Featured in Final Cut: Ladies and Gentlemen (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Sixteen Reasons
Written by Doree Post and Bill Post
Performed by Connie Stevens
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
By Arrangement with Warner Special Products
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User Reviews

 
Where does it begin and end??
30 November 2001 | by dmhumphreySee all my reviews

Hitchcock would be proud of this movie. Even when nothing happens, it is suspenseful. Director David Lynch overuses a few cheap thrill tricks here and there, but he intersperses them with other cinematographic techniques to keep it from becoming obtuse.

Altogether surreal, this movie is like waking up and remembering most of a dream but not enough to make it sensible. I am still trying to figure it all out and will probably have to see it again to catch things I missed and which may help me understand it better. It is a very detailed plot that very slowly comes together, so you must be patient and pay attention. Get your bathroom trip out of the way before it starts. And yet, the plot is overshadowed by the theme, the mood, the character development, and the filming techniques.

The dual roles of the main actress, Naomi Watts, showcase her enormous talent. That is, when I could get my eyes off of her co-star. What an acting pair.

Lynch surprises throughout the movie with unusual camera angles, the length/timing of editing cuts, jumping back and forth between scenes. Combined with smart use of music and sounds, it all helps to build suspense in our minds, doubtless a major objective of the director. Well, he kept me on the edge of my seat, even had me talking to the actors to be careful here, and not be so naive there. You know, the kind of stuff you want to smack your kids for doing at the movies.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

France | USA

Language:

English | Spanish | French

Release Date:

19 October 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mulholland Drive See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$587,591, 14 October 2001

Gross USA:

$7,220,243

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$20,130,922
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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