Vampire Count Orlok expresses interest in a new residence and real estate agent Hutter's wife.

Director:

F.W. Murnau

Writers:

Henrik Galeen (screen play), Bram Stoker (based on the novel: "Dracula")
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3,601 ( 880)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Max Schreck ... Graf Orlok
Gustav von Wangenheim ... Hutter (as Gustav v. Wangenheim)
Greta Schröder ... Ellen - seine Frau (as Greta Schroeder)
Georg H. Schnell Georg H. Schnell ... Harding - ein Reeder (as G.H. Schnell)
Ruth Landshoff Ruth Landshoff ... Ruth - seine Schwester
Gustav Botz Gustav Botz ... Professor Sievers - der Stadtarzt
Alexander Granach ... Knock - ein Häusermakler
John Gottowt ... Professor Bulwer - ein Paracelsianer
Max Nemetz Max Nemetz ... Ein Kapitän
Wolfgang Heinz Wolfgang Heinz ... 1. Matrose
Albert Venohr Albert Venohr ... 2. Matrose
Eric van Viele Eric van Viele ... Matrose 2
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Storyline

Wisbourg, Germany based estate agent Knock dispatches his associate, Hutter, to Count Orlok's castle in Transylvania as the Count wants to purchase an isolated house in Wisbourg. They plan on selling him the one across the way from Hutter's own home. Hutter leaves his innocent wife, Ellen, with some friends while he is away. Hutter's trek is an unusual one, with many locals not wanting to take him near the castle where strange events have been occurring. Once at the castle, Hutter does manage to sell the Count the house, but he also notices and feels unusual occurrences, primarily feeling like there is a dark shadow hanging over him, even in the daytime when the Count is unusually asleep. Hutter eventually sees the Count's sleeping chamber in a crypt, and based on a book he has recently read, believes the Count is really a vampire or Nosferatu. While Hutter is trapped in the castle, the Count, hiding in a shipment of coffins, makes his way to Wisbourg, causing death along his way, ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A thrilling mystery masterpiece - a chilling psycho-drama of blood-lust.

Genres:

Fantasy | Horror

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

F.W. Murnau frequently used arches, doorways and gates in this film to frame characters. In at least one occasion, he also manipulated a certain portion of a shot to achieve the desired frame effect. See more »

Goofs

When Count Orlok rises out of his coffin in the hull of the ship, there's a porthole right next to him and you can see bright daylight on the other side. See more »

Quotes

Ellen Hutter, seine Frau: I must go to him. He is coming !
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Alternate Versions

There are a confusing number of different surviving prints, restorations and alternate versions of Nosferatu. In the main, there are three 'complete' restorations and two incomplete, partially-restored versions. All five are available on DVD, while the latest two restorations, from 1995 and 2006, are also on Blu-ray. In addition there are countless low-quality public domain DVDs with different lengths, running speeds and soundtracks. All are derived from a single print held by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). They usually have replacement American intertitles and are always in black and white; the film was originally color tinted throughout and only meant to be seen that way. This comprehensive article explains all of them simply and clearly: Nosferatu: The Ultimate Blu-ray and DVD Guide. See more »

Connections

Version of Drácula (1931) See more »

User Reviews

My conception of the vampire made celluloid...
23 March 2000 | by keihanSee all my reviews

I despise most vampire stories. Not even Florence Stoker's dear departed husband could keep me occupied after the first act in Transylvania in "Dracula". The vampire has been so romanticized as an archetype (particularly during the '90s) that I can't but feel that most horror fans have forgotten exactly what made us afraid of these guys to begin with. Murnau's "Nosferatu" is just such a reminder and, because of that, is the only screen version of "Dracula" that I have ever loved.

Though Murnau, in the hopes of dodging the copyright bullet, took many liberties with the novel, he actually shot a great part of the film on location (an unusual practice for the time) in the historical Dracula's old stomping grounds: the Carpathian Mountains in Romania. The town, landscapes, and castles were all for real, not just some fancy studio backdrop. To me, it helps convey the tone of authenticity, as you can believe this story being told. As for Max Schreck, no charming, suave seducer is he. With his bald head, bushy eyebrows, rat-like teeth, pointed ears, nails as long as the fingers they are attached to, emaciated build, and stare that seems to come from the bottom of Hell itself, he is the primal, archetypal image of the vampire of legend.

While some could interpret this tale as a subtext to Nazism or anti-Semetism, at it's core, it's simply the tale of a monster, who brings ruin and death in his wake. That such a tale has managed to survive it's era, considering the obstacles that could have totally removed it from view, is the gain of all who have seen. Eat your heart out, Bela Lugosi.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Site

Country:

Germany

Language:

None | German

Release Date:

18 May 1922 (Estonia) See more »

Also Known As:

Nosferatu See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$19,054
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (video) | (DVD) | | (1997 restored) | (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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