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White Oak (1921)

Gambler Oak Miller seeks revenge on the man who misused his sister Rose, who is ill and under the care of the woman Oak loves, Barbara. The man Oak seeks, Granger, is planning to rob a ... See full summary »

Director:

Lambert Hillyer

Writers:

William S. Hart (story "Single Handed"), Bennet Musson (adaptation)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
William S. Hart ... Oak Miller - A Gambling Man
Vola Vale ... Barbara
Alexander Gaden ... Mark Granger
Robert Walker ... Barbara's Brother
Bert Sprotte Bert Sprotte ... Eliphalet Moss
Helen Holly Helen Holly ... Rose Miller
Chief Standing Bear Chief Standing Bear ... Chief Long Knife (as Luther Standing Bear)
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Storyline

Gambler Oak Miller seeks revenge on the man who misused his sister Rose, who is ill and under the care of the woman Oak loves, Barbara. The man Oak seeks, Granger, is planning to rob a wagon train with the collusion of the Indians under Chief Long Knife. When Barbara is suspected of killing her lascivious stepfather, Oak takes the blame and is arrested just before he is needed to save the threatened wagon train. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Western

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 December 1922 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Den hvide Mand See more »

Filming Locations:

Sacramento, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
A real dog-and-pony show
26 December 2006 | by lianfarrerSee all my reviews

The best performances in this film are turned in by Oak Miller's jealous paint horse and a dog named Jeff who brings about the heroic rescue of a wagon train under Indian attack. This creaky old horse opera contains just about every silent-western cliché you could think of, which makes it entertaining in ways its creators undoubtedly did not intend. The plot features not one, but TWO maidens whose virtue is threatened by men of evil intent. (In case you don't recognize the bad guys by their black hats, long beards, and shifty eyes, the titles will obligingly point them out for you.)

"Oak" is the perfect name for a character played by William S. Hart, whose acting technique seems to have been copied from that very material. Apparently he lavished much attention on making the movie's details—such as costumes and settings—as realistic and historically accurate as possible. Too bad he didn't give equal consideration to the storyline, which is repetitious, slow-moving, and lacking in excitement (outside of Jeff's heroic dash through the sagebrush for help).

A real antique, worth watching perhaps for its historical interest.


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