The Kid (1921) - News Poster

(1921)

News

Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid to be reimagined as animated sci-fi film

Variety is reporting that FilmNation is set to reimagine Charlie Chaplin’s 1921 classic The Kid as an animated sci-fi film, which is being directed by Rupert Wyatt (Rise of the Planet of the Apes) and Christian Volckman (Renaissance).

The as-yet-untitled film has been scripted by Boris Starling (Messiah), and is said to be “inspired by the characters and themes in The Kid“, although specific plot details are being kept under wraps.

“Animation gives (them) the unique opportunity to craft an original and moving story that explores technology and humanity, all told from the point of view of a boy and his robot,” said Marc Turtletaub and Peter Saraf of Big Beach.

“We’ve been waiting for a really exceptional project for FilmNation’s first animated feature. With a filmmaking team that is second to none, we are excited to help bring The Kid to a global audience,” added Glen Basner,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Charlie Chaplin's A Woman of Paris reviewed – archive, 1 March 1925

1 March 1925: This is a remarkable film, an historic film, a film to see and consider

Mr. Charles Spenser Chaplin has been enjoying a holiday from his boots and his hat. It has been a holiday in the true sense, which implies, not idleness, but the doing of a thing long desired in the desired way. His new film A Woman of Paris is the fruit of many years’ consideration, the logical development of that other holiday The Kid, and the fulfilment of his dream.

Like all good comedians, pushing aside a delirious desire to play Hamlet, Chaplin has sought a medium of tragic expression, cast here and everywhere, for an outlet for his serious emotions. His later comedies are shot with the Hamlet quality. But he is bounded by the little hat, and the boots and the cane, and a servant to the public in whose mind these things stand for laughter.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The 10 Best Criterion Collection DVDs and Blu-rays of 2016

  • Indiewire
The 10 Best Criterion Collection DVDs and Blu-rays of 2016
While everyone else is busy asking if the movies are dying or not, the Criterion Collection — year after year — is quietly devoting themselves to making sure that the medium will live forever.

Widely accepted as the gold standard of DVD, Blu-Ray, and beyond (2016 saw the company expand their grasp on the world of home video with the launch of FilmStruck, a streaming platform that’s largely dedicated to their roster of films and the cinephiles who can’t live without them), Criterion operates in a gilded bubble of their own design — it doesn’t matter if physical media is on the decline, people who swore off buying DVDs years ago still find themselves stockpiling those beautifully packaged Criterion editions like they’re building a library of precious volumes, like their homes would be glaringly incomplete without them.

The Best of 2016: IndieWire’s Year in Review Bible

2016 was business
See full article at Indiewire »

13 Actors that turned Director and won

  • Nerdly
In the golden age of movies, big name actors would often direct and produce their own movies. Spending 16 hour days on a film set is sure to teach you a thing or two about filmmaking and in some cases, this helps actors make the best directors. With the Cambridge Film Festival coming up, Cambridge storage solutions provider Storebox, wanted to celebrate a few of those actors who decided to branch out in the industry. They take a look at some of the ‘actor to director’ success stories and highlight just a few of the actors who took to directing and won.

Ron Howard

Some may know Ron Howard better as Happy Days Richie Cunningham, and best friend of The Fonz. However, after leaving the hit show in 1980, he changed course and directed his first, low-budget film Grand Theft Auto. Since his directorial debut, Ron Howard has gone on to direct
See full article at Nerdly »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 42 – Silent Film Music with Ben Model

Mark and Aaron welcome Ben Model, silent film historian, accompanist, distributor, and enthusiast. He gave a presentation about “undercranking” on Criterion’s release of Chaplin’s The Kid. We discuss the idea of undercranking, scoring silent music, and the state of silent media today theatrically and in the home video market.

Episode Links & Notes

Special Guest: Ben Model from Silent Film Music and Undercrank Productions. You can find him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

0:00 – Intro and Welcome Ben

1:15 – Ben’s Criterion Connection

4:00 – Discussion and explanation of undercranking

18:20 – Ben’s background

24:00 –Silent films on Criterion and other labels

27:20 – Silent Film Kickstarters

38:00 – Silent Film discussion

Silent Film Music – YouTube Silent Film Music podcast Kickstarter – Accidentally Preserved Rare and Lost Silent Films Kickstarter – When Knighthood Was in Flower Kickstarter – The Bridge’s Play Kickstarter – Pioneers of African-American Cinema Movies Silently – Top Five Silent Film Directors Seriously
See full article at CriterionCast »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Femme Fatale,’ Hou Hsiao-hsien, ‘Pusher,’ Maya Deren & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The Brian De Palma retrospective has its best weekend yet: Carlito’s Way and Raising Cain on Friday; Body Double and Femme Fatale on Saturday; and, this Sunday, Mission: Impossible, Snake Eyes, and the underseen, Paul Schrader-penned Obsession.

A program of Chuck Jones shorts plays on Saturday; Party Husband screens this Sunday.

Museum of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Daily | Rivette, Chaplin, Akerman

In today's roundup of news and views, we collect further tributes to the late Jacques Rivette. Plus: Essays on Charles Chaplin's The Kid, Nagisa Oshima's Death by Hanging, Mike Nichols's The Graduate, Chantal Akerman's News from Home, Fritz Lang and Thea von Harbou, George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, Louis Ck's Horace and Pete, David O. Russell's Joy, Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson's Anomalisa, Philippe Garrel's In the Shadow of Women, the impact of War Games and The Blair Witch Project as well as Jonathan Rosenbaum on Kon Ichikawa, Pedro Costa, Yasujiro Ozu, Danièle Huillet and Marcel L’Herbier. And more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Rivette, Chaplin, Akerman

In today's roundup of news and views, we collect further tributes to the late Jacques Rivette. Plus: Essays on Charles Chaplin's The Kid, Nagisa Oshima's Death by Hanging, Mike Nichols's The Graduate, Chantal Akerman's News from Home, Fritz Lang and Thea von Harbou, George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, Louis Ck's Horace and Pete, David O. Russell's Joy, Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson's Anomalisa, Philippe Garrel's In the Shadow of Women, the impact of War Games and The Blair Witch Project as well as Jonathan Rosenbaum on Kon Ichikawa, Pedro Costa, Yasujiro Ozu, Danièle Huillet and Marcel L’Herbier. And more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Criterion Collection: The Kid | Blu-ray Review

Outfitted with a new score and title sequence, reedited sans several scenes involving the woman, and rereleased in 1972, Charlie Chaplin’s first feature length film The Kid has finally made its way to home video in HD thanks to the Cineteca di Bologna’s gloriously meticulous restoration and 4k digital transfer. Originally released back in 1921 after about a half decade of acting and eventually directing wildly popular shorts for Keystone Studios, the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company and finally the Mutual Film Corporation, the film endured a year long production amidst personal and professional crisis. It was thought that Chaplin’s signature brand of comedic slapstick, which typically ran just two reels of film, could not support the length of a six reel feature, but as is evidenced within, the film perfectly fuses Chaplin’s penchant for melodrama with his masterful vaudevillian humor to create an astonishingly emotional comedy that plumbs
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Steve Jobs,’ ‘The Kid,’ ‘Munich,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Kid (Charlie Chaplin)

Charlie Chaplin was already an international star when he decided to break out of the short-film format and make his first full-length feature. The Kid doesn’t merely show Chaplin at a turning point, when he proved that he was a serious film director—it remains an expressive masterwork of silent cinema. In it, he stars as his lovable Tramp character, this time raising an orphan (a remarkable young Jackie Coogan) he has rescued from the streets.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Blu-ray Review: The Kid Is Born Again On Criterion Blu-ray

In 1921, The Kid marked a huge milestone in the career of the cinema's greatest clown, Charlie Chaplin. It was his coming out party, his graduation from two reel short films to full length features, and its success would decide the path that Chaplin would take in his immediate and long term future. By this time Chaplin was already incredibly famous; his comedic shorts with both Chaplin and Sennett Studios had made him one of the biggest stars in Hollywood. He had yet to undertake the challenge of a feature-length film, however, and this challenge appealed to him.Chaplin wasn't the first major star to take on a feature-length comedy, he was beaten to the punch by the legendary Buster Keaton's The Saphead, a film I reviewed on...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: Charles Chaplin's "The Kid" (1921); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Tramps And Orphans”

By Raymond Benson

The Criterion Collection continues its excellent re-issuing of Charles Chaplin’s major works with The Kid, the first full-length feature from the filmmaker. Released in 1921, Chaplin expanded on the two and three reelers he had been making (a “reel” at that time was approximately 10-15 minutes long) to the six-reels of The Kid (the original cut was just over an hour; Chaplin re-edited it in the early 70s to create the now standard 53-minute version). It’s still a short film, but longer than what were considered “shorts.”

The Kid received high acclaim on its release and was one of the writer/actor/director’s most popular pictures. This was in part due to the presence of young Jackie Coogan in the titular role. Coogan, who grew up to play Uncle Fester in The Addams Family television series of the 1960s, steals the movie
See full article at CinemaRetro »

This week’s new film events

Slapstick | Horror-On-Sea

The mechanics and dynamics of silent comedy didn’t die with the advent of the talkies – just look at last year’s Shaun The Sheep Movie. A breadth of remit allows this silent and classic comedy film festival to stray beyond the confines of early cinema, although it always manages to find more of that out there. New (re)discoveries this year include Mancunian comedies (from the studio once known as “Jollywood”), silent westerns and a Soviet menage a trois. In addition you get sound-assisted slapstick such as Cary Grant’s breakthrough The Awful Truth (introduced by comedian Lucy Porter), and guests including Stephen Merchant, Ken Dodd, Tim Vine (on Sgt Bilko), and Marcus Brigstocke in conversation with the makers of Shaun The Sheep. And if all else fails, you can’t go wrong with an orchestrally accompanied screening of Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Edward Yang's 'A Brighter Summer Day,' Plus Films By John Frankenheimer & Jacques Rivette Hit Criterion In March

As you cross off the list of who you need to buy presents for, with Christmas in just one week, this probably isn't the best time to be wave Criterion Collection titles in front of your face. But the boutique label just dropped their March slate, and it's a cinephile's dream. After a long, long, long wait, fans of Edward Yang ("Yi-Yi") will finally have a chance to own what has long been considered his masterpiece: "A Brighter Summer Day." The epic 237-minute film has been give a 4K restoration and will come packaged with a documentary about the New Taiwanese cinema movement, a recorded performance of Yang's play, "Likely Consequence," and much more. This is a big, must-have title, and in the era of streaming, a reminder why people like Criterion are still very crucial for movie lovers. Read More: 'The Graduate,' Charlie Chaplin's 'The Kid,
See full article at The Playlist »

13 Black Friday Deals for the Entertainment Junkie

  • The Wrap
13 Black Friday Deals for the Entertainment Junkie
Movies The Criterion Collection 50% Off (Barnes & Noble) For the serious film buff, there is nothing better than a Criterion Collection DVD or Blu-Ray of modern and classic films, from Charlie Chaplin‘s “The Kid” to the Coens’ “Inside Llewyn Davis.” Barnes & Noble and Bn.com have their entire Criterion selection on sale for 50% off, and the sale should continue through Thanksgiving weekend. Amazon Deals Calendar $1.96+ (Amazon) As usual, Amazon will be rolling out deals on DVDs and Blu-Rays throughout the Thanksgiving weekend. From $1.96 for “The Goonies” to under $10 on everything from “Mad Max: Fury Road” and the entire first season.
See full article at The Wrap »

The Newsstand – Episode 50 – Criterion’s January and February 2016 Line-up

This month on the Newsstand, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee to discuss the January and February (2016) Criterion Collection line-ups, as well as the latest in Criterion rumors, news, packaging, and more.

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Contact us with any feedback.

Shownotes Topics January Line-up February Line-up Latest newsletter tease (Paris nous appartient, Only Angels Have Wings) Manchurian Candidate Clouds Of Sils Maria Chimes At Midnight (Wex Arts Cinema Revival) Kieslowski films on Fandor Barnes & Noble Sale Criterion Blogathon Liv Ullmann, Angela Landsbury, and John Waters spotted at Criterion on Instagram 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days tease Shanghai Express Episode Links The Complete Lady Snowblood Lady Snowblood (1973) Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance (1974) The American Friend (1977) Bitter Rice (1949) Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) Gilda (1946) The Emigrants/The New Land The New Land (1972) The Emigrants (1971) The Kid (1921) The Graduate (1967) I Knew Her Well (1965) Paris Belongs to Us Only Angels Have Wings Liv Ullmann 4 Months,
See full article at CriterionCast »

'The Graduate,' 'The Kid' and More Classics Hitting Criterion Collection in February

'The Graduate,' 'The Kid' and More Classics Hitting Criterion Collection in February
Read More: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection There may be many a milestone to hit before 2016, but The Criterion Collection is moving ahead into the new year with full force by announcing the five titles that will be added to DVD and Blu-ray come February of next year.  With the addition of the iconic coming-of-age comedy-drama "The Graduate," the late Mike Nichols will finally be joining Criterion for the very first time. Additionally, the company is responding to some of the biggest cinephile requests they've ever gotten by bringing the two-part Swedish masterpiece "The Emigrants"/"The New Land" to their library, marking its first-ever home video release in the United Sates. Other notable titles include Charlie Chaplin's debut feature "The Kid" and Nagisa Oshima's surreal black comedy "Death by Hanging." Below are all five titles hitting Criterion in February 2016, complete...
See full article at Indiewire »

The Cut | Review

Third Cut is the Deepest: Akin’s Barren Examination of Armenian Genocide

Turkish-German director Fatih Akin concludes his decade in the making ‘Love, Death, and the Devil’ trilogy with The Cut, a film documenting the devastation of the 1915 Armenian genocide. It is the second film to reach theatrical release in 2015 dealing with the century old tragedy, following the aptly titled 1915 directed by Garin Hovannisian and Alec Mouhibian (both films notably star French-Armenian actor Simon Abkarian), and does convey a certain sense of nobly epic proportions in regards to the detrimental scope of an event robbed of the same historical urgency as several genocides since. But the nature of these horrors are lost in Akin’s overly refined handling of the material, whittled down to one father’s ceaseless journey to reclaim the kin war has separated him from. Those unlikely to appreciate a certain sense of honorable intention in Akin
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Newsstand – Episode 47 – The October Criterion Line-up, The Barnes & Noble Sale, And More!

This month on the Newsstand, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee to discuss the October 2015 Criterion Collection line-up, as well as the latest in Criterion rumors, news, packaging, and more.

Subscribe to The Newsstand in iTunes or via RSS

Contact us with any feedback.

Shownotes Topics The October 2015 Criterion Collection Line-up The Barnes & Noble Sale Jellyfish Eyes The Apu Trilogy New additions to Hulu / iTunes The Kid Don’t Look Back Episode Links The October 2015 Criterion Collection line-up: … My Own Private Idaho (1991) Instagram photo by Criterion Collection (My Own Private Idaho tease) • May 27, 2015 at 7:00 Am The Brood (1979) David Cronenberg’s The Brood has been picked up by… David Cronenberg’s The Brood and Scanners are now… A Special Day (1977) Kwaidan (1965) Kwaidan | Eureka Criterion Reflections: Kwaidan (1964) – #90 Kwaidan (film) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) Kwaidan Vs. Kwaidan – Film Forum on mubi.com Mulholland Dr. (2001) The latest wacky drawing from the Criterion… f-davis:
See full article at CriterionCast »

Francesco Rosi – a maestro at the cutting edge by Richard Mowe

Salvatore Giuliano won Rosi a Silver Bear at Berlin Film Festival The great Italian director Francesco Rosi, who has died aged 92, had a remarkable career of films that dissected the political and criminal corruption that was endemic in Italian society.

Developing a style of dramatic political cinema, he created an international reputation for exciting filmmaking that remains powerful today. Borrowing from the success of American models he appropriated the gangster film and made it his own. He focused on creating a socially committed cinema that remained entertaining and accessible to audiences at home and abroad.

When Rosi was just four years old, his father took him to see Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid. Afterwards, his father dressed his son as Jackie Coogan and snapped his photo. Then Rosi senior entered the sepia image in a local look-alike contest. It won, and the young Rosi said that he knew from that
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
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