7.2/10
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Starship Troopers (1997)

Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
Humans in a fascist, militaristic future wage war with giant alien bugs.

Director:

Paul Verhoeven

Writers:

Edward Neumeier (screenplay) (as Ed Neumeier), Robert A. Heinlein (book)
Popularity
672 ( 27)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 3 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Casper Van Dien ... Johnny Rico
Dina Meyer ... Dizzy Flores
Denise Richards ... Carmen Ibanez
Jake Busey ... Ace Levy
Neil Patrick Harris ... Carl Jenkins
Clancy Brown ... Sgt. Zim
Seth Gilliam ... Sugar Watkins
Patrick Muldoon ... Zander Barcalow
Michael Ironside ... Jean Rasczak
Rue McClanahan ... Biology Teacher
Marshall Bell ... General Owen
Eric Bruskotter ... Breckinridge
Matt Levin ... Kitten Smith
Blake Lindsley ... Katrina
Anthony Ruivivar ... Shujimi
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Storyline

In the distant future high school kids are encouraged to become citizens by joining the military. What they don't know is that they'll soon be engaged in a full scale war against a planet of alien insects. The fight is on to ensure the safety of humanity. Written by Christopher Van Pelt

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The paratroopers of the future are here... and their enemies aren't HUMAN See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for graphic sci-fi violence and gore, and for some language and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mazzy Star's "Fade Into You" plays during the fight between Zander (Patrick Muldoon) and Rico. See more »

Goofs

When Rasczak's mobile infantry troop are on their way to investigate the distress call on Planet P, Rico is scanning the tops of the canyon walls with binoculars. When he almost sees the winged Arachnid, there are rocks falling. A hand can be seen lobbing one of the rocks over the wall. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Newsreel announcer: Young people from all over the globe are joining up to fight for the future.
Soldier #1: I'm doing my part.
Soldier #2: I'm doing my part.
Soldier #3: I'm doing my part.
Young kid dressed up as a soldier: I'm doing my part too.
[Soldiers laugh]
Newsreel announcer: They're doing their part. Are you? Join the Mobile Infantry and save the world. Service guarantees citizenship.
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Alternate Versions

The Australian Cable, VHS, DVD, and theatrical releases are uncut. The free-to-air TV version makes a few cuts in order to receive an 'M' rating so that the movie may be shown at an earlier 8:30pm time-slot. Nudity and language are intact, and the following scenes are cut for violence:
  • The decapitation/trench run at the beginning is cut by a few seconds. In the middle of the movie where the scene is replayed, it is still cut. The death of the cameraman is not shown and cuts to Rico shooting the bug still.
  • The 'knife' scene is cut. The knife is thrown, but it is not actually shown going into the hand, let alone Zim calling out Medic! when he pulls the knife out.
  • Shujumi's death is cut, the Bug doesn't carry him around before chucking him away.
  • One of the announcement breaks are cut, The one when the reports of Mormons settle on a military base, with the corpses being shown.
  • When the Radio Technician is picked up by a Flying Bug, the initial stinging of him is cut.
  • When Rasczak has his legs bitten off, the shot of Rico fully plays out over the gunshot wound to Rasczak, instead of cutting to the shot.
  • The three victims of the Tanker Bug are cut.
  • The showing of Farley with his brains gone is cut.
  • Numerous cuts occur on the attack on the military base.
  • Dizzy's death is cut, the initial 2 stabs are in, the next 2 stabs are cut and the pulling out of the claw is cut too, just Rico and Levy carry her back to the lifeboat.
  • A shot of Carmen wincing in pain after she gets stabbed by a Bug is cut
  • The scene where the brain bug sucks Zander's brains out is cut; it cuts away to a shot of Carmenafter the head is pierced.
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Soundtracks

Intense
Written by Karen Poole, Terence Martin & Shelly Poole (as Michelle Poole)
Performed by Alisha's Attic
Courtesy of Mercury Records Limited
By Arrangement with PolyGram Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

"War makes fascists of us all"
21 November 2014 | by rooprectSee all my reviews

My title is a quote from director Paul Veerhoven who makes no attempt to water down his political views in "Starship Troopers", a merciless, satirical skewering of those superpowers throughout history who believe war solves the world's problems.

That opening sentence is a mouthful, so let me explain a little further. In the director's commentary, Mr. Veerhoven makes no bones about naming the USA as the greatest offender. In an awkwardly funny moment, his co-commenter, screenwriter Edward Neumeier, mutters "Yeah but we did save your ass in World War II." To which Mr. Veerhoven clarifies, "But this is not about World War II, it's about what happened *after* World War II." And thus, the entire philosophy is explained in a way that patriots as well as pinko commies can understand. "Starship Troopers" is a cautionary tale about what happens when war ceases to be a necessary evil and instead becomes an unnecessary thrill. It begins with some hilariously obvious propaganda satires, all about joining the military (including a funny scene of a 12 year old kid in full battle attire). The rest of the movie is peppered with such dark comedic skits, a lot like Veerhoven's "Robocop" a decade earlier.

Where the film is brilliant (or disastrous, see below) is in the way the battle scenes do thrill us, almost to the point that we lose ourselves in the hysteria of warfare, and only upon sober reflection do we realize that Mr. Veerhoven has just proved how easy it is to become a mindless minion of violence. The disastrous part is that I'm afraid many audience members never sobered up and walked out of the theater thinking "Go war!" Such is the pitfall of making a satire; you run the risk of promoting the very thing you seek to ridicule.

Something very interesting that Veerhoven did was to use giant bugs as the enemy. I mean, who doesn't hate bugs?? Certainly no human I know. And that's the point: by presenting an enemy that's so universally hated as a bug, Veerhoven turns the magnifying glass on ourselves and challenges us to answer why we hate bugs, why we like to kill them so violently (crushed until their guts spew out) or gassed so that they die of painful asphyxiation before our eyes. If you caught the message of this film, you'll probably think twice about stomping that little spider who had the misfortune of being sighted in your presence.

Oh a final note that's a very nice touch. There's a scene in this film where a bunch of kids are stomping on cockroaches. You'll be pleased to know that the cockroaches were fake, and literally no animals were harmed in the making of this film. Touché, Mr. Veerhoven.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 November 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bug Hunt at Outpost Nine See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$105,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,058,773, 9 November 1997

Gross USA:

$54,814,377

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$121,214,377
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | SDDS (8 channels)| Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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