7.9/10
44,305
200 user 115 critic

Days of Heaven (1978)

A hot-tempered farm laborer convinces the woman he loves to marry their rich but dying boss so that they can have a claim to his fortune.

Director:

Terrence Malick

Writer:

Terrence Malick
Reviews
Popularity
4,495 ( 94)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 12 wins & 12 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Badlands (1973)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

An impressionable teenage girl from a dead-end town and her older greaser boyfriend embark on a killing spree in the South Dakota badlands.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek, Warren Oates
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Adaptation of James Jones' autobiographical 1962 novel, focusing on the conflict at Guadalcanal during the second World War.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Jim Caviezel, Sean Penn, Nick Nolte
Drama | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

The story of a family in Waco, Texas in 1956. The eldest son witnesses the loss of innocence and struggles with his parents' conflicting teachings.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, Jessica Chastain
The New World (2005)
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

The story of the English exploration of Virginia, and of the changing world and loves of Pocahontas.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Colin Farrell, Q'orianka Kilcher, Christopher Plummer
To the Wonder (2012)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

After falling in love in Paris, Marina and Neil come to Oklahoma, where problems arise. Their church's Spanish-born pastor struggles with his faith, while Neil encounters a woman from his childhood.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Ben Affleck, Olga Kurylenko, Javier Bardem
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

A writer indulging in all that Los Angeles and Las Vegas has to offer undertakes a search for love and self via a series of adventures with six different women.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Christian Bale, Cate Blanchett, Natalie Portman
Song to Song I (2017)
Drama | Music | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

Two intersecting love triangles. Obsession and betrayal set against the music scene in Austin, Texas.

Director: Terrence Malick
Stars: Ryan Gosling, Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Richard Gere ... Bill
Brooke Adams ... Abby
Sam Shepard ... The Farmer
Linda Manz ... Linda
Robert J. Wilke ... The Farm Foreman (as Robert Wilke)
Jackie Shultis Jackie Shultis ... Linda's Friend
Stuart Margolin ... Mill Foreman
Timothy Scott ... Harvest Hand (as Tim Scott)
Gene Bell Gene Bell ... Dancer
Doug Kershaw ... Fiddler
Richard Libertini ... Vaudeville Leader
Frenchie Lemond Frenchie Lemond ... Vaudeville Wrestler
Sahbra Markus Sahbra Markus ... Vaudeville Dancer
Bob Wilson Bob Wilson ... Accountant
Muriel Jolliffe Muriel Jolliffe ... Headmistress
Edit

Storyline

Bill and Abby, a young couple who to the outside world pretend to be brother and sister are living and working in Chicago at the beginning of the century. They want to escape the poverty and hard labor of the city and travel south. Together with the girl Linda (who acts as the narrator in the movie) they find employment on a farm in the Texas panhandle. When the harvest is over the young, rich and handsome farmer invites them to stay because he has fallen in love with Abby. When Bill and Abby discover that the farmer is seriously ill and has only got a year left to live they decide that Abby will accept his wedding proposal in order to make some benefit out of the situation. When the expected death fails to come, jealousy and impatience are slowly setting in and accidents become eventually inevitable. Written by Theo de Grood <tdg@xs4all.nl>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Your eyes... Your ears... Your senses... will be overwhelmed. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

6 October 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Días de gloria See more »

Filming Locations:

Raymond, Alberta, Canada See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$3,446,749, 31 December 1978
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

With its Oscar win for Best Cinematography, this is, as of 2016, the only film directed by Terrence Malick to win an Academy Award. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the movie where the train is pulling up toward three red grain elevators with sunburst symbols on them, people are seen hopping off the train. Stenciled one of the train cars is A.P.R.A., which stands for Alberta Pioneer Railroad Association, which never had a rail line operating in the panhandle of Texas. This portion of the film was shot in Alberta, however. See more »

Quotes

Linda: This farmer, he had a big spread, and a lot of money. Whoever was sitting in a chair when he'd come around, why they'd stand up and give it to him.
Linda: Wasn't no harm in him. You'd give him a flower, he'd keep it forever.
See more »


Soundtracks

Swamp Dance
Words and Music by Doug Kershaw
Performed by Doug Kershaw
Used by permission of Tree Publishing Co., Inc. B.M.I. Copyright 1974
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
"You'd give him a flower, he'd keep it forever"
15 August 2009 | by ackstasisSee all my reviews

Terrence Malick is less a storyteller than a visual poet. At times, the images in 'Days of Heaven (1978)' seem too beautiful to be believed – could Mother Nature even construct such moments of magnificence at her own accord? Cinematographers Néstor Almendros and Haskell Wexler (credited only as "additional photographer") consistently shot the film during the "magic hour" between darkness and sunrise/sunset, when the sun's radiance is missing from the sky, and so their colours have a muted presence, as though filtered through the stalks of wheat that saturate the landscape. Crucial alongside the film's photographers are composer Ennio Morricone – utilising a variation on the seventh movement ("Aquarium") in Camille Saint-Saëns's "Carnival of the Animals" suite – and a succession of sound editors, whose work brings a dreamy, ethereal edge to the vast fields of the Texas Panhandle. The film's final act, away from the wheat-fields, recalls Arthur Penn's 'Bonnie and Clyde (1967),' but otherwise Malick's style, contemplative and elegiac, is in a class of its own, more comparable perhaps to Kurosawa's 'Dersu Uzala (1975).'

Malick refuses to explore his characters' motivations. The viewer is deliberately kept at an arm's length, and Malick eschews cinema's traditional notions of narrative development. Instead, the story is told as a succession of fleeting moments, the sort that a young girl (the film's narrator, Linda Manz) might pick up through her day-to-day experiences and muted understanding of adult emotions. Note that the girl is always kept separate from the dramatic crux of the film – the love-triangle between Billy, Abby, and the Farmer – and her comprehension of events is tainted by her adolescent grasp on adult relationships and societal norms. I was reminded of Andrew Dominik's recent 'The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)' {another sumptuously-photographed picture}, which also refused to explore its title character, Jesse James, kept at a distance through the impartial objectivity of the historical narrator. In Malick's film, Linda's narration tells us one thing, and the viewer sees another. But one can never fully understand the complex emotions driving human behaviour, so perhaps the girl's perspective is as good as any other.

'Days of Heaven' derives its title from a passage in the Bible (Deuteronomy 11:21), and Malick's tale of jealousy and desire is suitably Biblical in nature. Essential to this allegory is an apocalyptic plague of locusts, which descend upon the wheat-fields like an army from the heavens. When the fields erupt into flame, quite literally from the broiling emotions of the film's conflicted characters, the viewer is confronted by the most intense manifestation of Hell-on- Earth since the burning village in Bondarchuk's 'War and Peace (1967).' But, interestingly, Malick here regresses on his own allegory: Judgement Day isn't the end, but rather it comes and goes. Life is driven by the inexorable march of Fate: The Farmer (Sam Shepard) is doomed to die within a year; Bill (Richard Gere) is doomed to repeat his mistakes twice over. In the film's final moments, Linda and her newfound friend embark purposelessly along the railway tracks, the tracks being a physical incarnation of Fate itself: their paths are laid down already, but we mortals can never know precisely where they lead until we get there.


10 of 12 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 200 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Comedy Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular comedy titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed