5.9/10
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41 user 5 critic

Live a Little, Love a Little (1968)

Trailer
2:09 | Trailer
Photographer Greg Nolan moonlights in two full-time jobs to pay the rent, but has trouble finding time to do them both without his bosses finding out.

Director:

Norman Taurog

Writers:

Michael A. Hoey (screenplay), Dan Greenburg (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Elvis Presley ... Greg Nolan
Michele Carey ... Bernice
Don Porter ... Mike Lansdown
Rudy Vallee ... Penlow
Dick Sargent ... Harry
Sterling Holloway ... Milkman
Celeste Yarnall ... Ellen
Eddie Hodges ... Delivery Boy
Joan Shawlee ... Robbie's Mother
Mary Grover Mary Grover ... Miss Selfridge
Emily Banks ... RKC&P Receptionist
Michael Keller Michael Keller ... Art Director
Merri Ashley Merri Ashley ... 1st Secretary
Phyllis Davis ... 2nd Secretary
Ursula Menzel Ursula Menzel ... Perfume Model
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Storyline

Photographer Greg Nolan meets Bernice, and loses both his job and his apartment. However, Bernice manages to get him a new apartment, but it is so expensive that he has to get two full-time jobs. Nolan has trouble finding time to do them both without his bosses finding out. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

ELVIS PRESLEY show you how to Live a Little, Love a Little See more »


Certificate:

M | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film marked the end of Presley's streak of working with longtime director Norman Taurog. Their collaboration began in 1960 with G.I. Blues (1960), which was followed by Blue Hawaii (1961), Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962), It Happened at the World's Fair (1963), Tickle Me (1965), Spinout (1966), Double Trouble (1967), and Speedway (1968). Altogether they made nine films. The only other notable directors who worked with Elvis more than once were:

Richard Thorpe directed Jailhouse Rock (1957) and Fun in Acapulco (1963));

Gene Nelson directed Kissin' Cousins (1964) and Harum Scarum (1965);

John Rich directed Roustabout (1964) and Easy Come, Easy Go (1967));

and Peter Tewksbury directed Stay Away, Joe (1968) and The Trouble with Girls (1969). See more »

Goofs

At 35 minutes in, Elvis visits the offices of Classic Cat Magazine. Signage on the wall reading "Classic Cat / A Landsdown Enterprise" appears next to a sexy illustration of a bosomy model. We then see the signage from Elvis's perspective, and now additional lettering appears out of nowhere: "CLASSIC CAT MAGAZINE" in block letters. Then we see the original perspective, and the lettering has disappeared. See more »

Quotes

Greg Nolan: That wouldn't be a screwdriver you have there would it?
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Connections

Spoofed in The Dukes of Hazzard: One Armed Bandits (1979) See more »

Soundtracks

Almost in Love
(uncredited)
Written by Luiz Bonfá & Randy Starr
Performed by Elvis Presley
See more »

User Reviews

 
The Edge of Reality
18 September 2007 | by CosmicDwellingsSee all my reviews

I recently viewed this underrated gem for the first time in many years and almost forgot what an entertaining ride it is - especially in that 'speed buggy' at the start of the opening sequence.

I very much prefer the movies Elvis was churning out towards the end of his movie career as opposed to the likes of "Harum Scarum", "Clambake" and "Easy Come, Easy Go".

"Live A Little..." gave us a more mature Elvis in his first adult-type comedy film role, and even though the script engages a series of weird scenarios that border on the insane, it's great to see EP make his mark in this type of movie. Elvis looks great physically and his wardrobe too has got to be admired - check out the scene were he is wearing those shades...so cool! The film boasts only four songs but they appear to be of a higher standard than most of his mid-60's vehicles. The two stand-out numbers are the No. 1 smash hit "A Little Less Conversation" and the dramatic dream sequence of "Edge of Reality".

The tag line of the movie is "Watch Elvis click with these chicks!" and that he most certainly does especially in the form of leading lady Michelle Carey and Co-Star, Celeste Yarnall ('Miss Little Less Conversation'). Elvis' pet Great Dane, 'Brutus' also gets a co-starring role and almost steals the show - his character is called 'Albert'! A fine male cast helps the proceedings too in the form of Dick Sargent, Don Porter and veteran singing 'heartthrob', Rudy Vallee. So, "Live A Little, Love A Little" is entertainingly weird and wonderful and along with "Charro", "The Trouble With Girls" and "Change of Habit" was the slight departure from his typical sixties musical that Elvis needed at this point in his career.

Finally, if you're only viewing this as just a curiosity piece then be curious enough to check out that amazing fight scene in the Newspaper printing warehouse - this has got to be the best fight scene in an Elvis movie ever staged!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 October 1968 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kiss My Firm But Pliant Lips See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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