7.7/10
15,597
127 user 87 critic

Johnny Guitar (1954)

Not Rated | | Drama, Western | 23 August 1954 (USA)
After helping a wounded gang member, a strong-willed female saloon owner is wrongly suspected of murder and bank robbery by a lynch mob.

Director:

Nicholas Ray

Writers:

Philip Yordan (screenplay), Roy Chanslor (based on novel by)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Joan Crawford ... Vienna
Sterling Hayden ... Johnny 'Guitar' Logan
Mercedes McCambridge ... Emma Small
Scott Brady ... Dancin' Kid
Ward Bond ... John McIvers
Ben Cooper ... Turkey Ralston
Ernest Borgnine ... Bart Lonergan
John Carradine ... Old Tom
Royal Dano ... Corey
Frank Ferguson ... Marshal Williams
Paul Fix ... Eddie
Rhys Williams ... Mr. Andrews
Ian MacDonald ... Pete
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Storyline

Vienna has built a saloon outside of town, and she hopes to build her own town once the railroad is put through, but the townsfolk want her gone. When four men hold up a stagecoach and kill a man the town officials, led by Emma Small, come to the saloon to grab four of Vienna's friends, the Dancin' Kid and his men. Vienna stands strong against them, and is aided by the presence of an old acquaintance of hers, Johnny Guitar, who is not what he seems. Written by Ed Sutton <esutton@mindspring.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Caught in the crossfire of danger and desire. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sterling Hayden said: "There is not enough money in Hollywood to lure me into making another picture with Joan Crawford. And I like money." See more »

Goofs

When the posse rides through the waterfall Emma Small's clothes are bone dry even though she already passed through the waterfall earlier. See more »

Quotes

Marshal Williams: [the posse has come to Vienna's, demanding the whereabouts of the Dancin' Kid's gang] We came for the Kid and his bunch.
Vienna: [Calmly sitting and playing the piano] That's what you said yesterday.
Marshal Williams: We came for you too, Vienna.
Vienna: [Still playing the piano, unperturbed] Why? I had nothing to do with robbing the bank. Every man here knows that. I don't have to hold up banks. All I have to do is sit here and wait for the railroad to come through. And that is my intention.
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Connections

Referenced in Viva la clase media (1980) See more »

Soundtracks

Johnny Guitar
by Peggy Lee and Victor Young
Sung by Peggy Lee
Heard instrumentally over the opening credits and throughout the film
Played on the piano by Joan Crawford (dubbed)
Sung partially at the end by Peggy Lee
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User Reviews

color, in black and white
27 January 2008 | by robvealSee all my reviews

Boy this is a jewel, and for many different reasons. A good lot of people deserve credit for their work

First is Nicholas Ray for his direction. A fine preparation and presentation of the visual elements really took some doing. The use, but not excessive glorification (thank goodness), of the relatively new Trucolor is well-done; the horses full of black-clad riders rushing up the rocky hill in the night, the many shots of the furious blazes dissolving Vienna's place, and so much more.

The acting is remarkable. Sterling Heyden, just in standing before the camera and delivering his lines in that firm and fearless manner (ala Asphalt Jungle), is a strong presence. John Carradine once again shows himself as the precious dramatist he proved himself to be many years before in The Grapes of Wrath.

What strikes me the most, though, is Ben Maddow's (thank Phillip Yordan for being an heroic front) screenplay. It is not only thick in theme and symbolism, it is thick with what was (at the time) almost unprecedented elements. Both Vienna and Emma are, as either GOOD or BAD, shown as the leaders of men! Pacifism is being shown as a good thing! Is that the good guys wearing black and the bad guys wearing white (or maybe the other way around)?! As many comments have mentioned, the Un-American Activities Committee parallels (complete with the entire Ox-Bow-esquire element) are, really, quite thinly veiled. The economically powerful, Small and McIver, are dominant and monopolistic capitalists (a version of antagonism almost unseen, for obvious reasons, since the McCarthey-assaulted Force of Evil). Remember, this is 1954!!!! This stuff is downright revolutionary! How did they ever get it all past the censors and masters of the code?

Let's hope time doesn't forget this one in favor of some formulaic shoot-'em-ups simply because they feature "the Duke."


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 August 1954 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Johnny Guitar See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,604
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Republic Pictures (I) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color (Trucolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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