6.3/10
1,480
16 user 13 critic

The Rounders (1914)

Unrated | | Comedy, Short | 7 September 1914 (USA)
Two drunks live in the same hotel. One beats his wife, the other is beaten by his. They go off and get drunk together. They try to sleep in a restaurant using tables as beds and are thrown ... See full summary »

Director:

Charles Chaplin (uncredited)

Writer:

Charles Chaplin
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charles Chaplin ... 1st Reveller
Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle ... 2nd Reveller - Charlie's Neighbor
Phyllis Allen Phyllis Allen ... Charlie's Wife
Minta Durfee ... Fatty's Wife
Al St. John ... Bellhop / Waiter
Peggy Page Peggy Page ... (as Miss Page)
Edit

Storyline

Two drunks live in the same hotel. One beats his wife, the other is beaten by his. They go off and get drunk together. They try to sleep in a restaurant using tables as beds and are thrown out. They lie down in a row boat which fills with water, drowning them (a fate apparently better than going home to their wives). Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Short

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the shots is shown in reverse to give the impression that Arbuckle and Chaplin rush to the edge of a lake and Chaplin almost falls in. As a tipoff to this technique, watch for the man walking backward in the background, and compare the rippling waves in the shot with the direction of the rippling in the following lakeside shot. See more »

Quotes

Title Card: Asleep In The Deep
See more »

Connections

Featured in Birth of Hollywood: Episode #1.1 (2011) See more »

User Reviews

Mildly Entertaining; Fun to See Arbuckle and Chaplin together
3 March 2004 | by Snow LeopardSee all my reviews

It's fun to see Roscoe Arbuckle and Charlie Chaplin together (plus a couple of brief appearances by Al St. John), although this movie as a whole is only mildly entertaining. Not that either of the stars disappoints, by any means, but the material limits them somewhat. It's also interesting, though, to see an earlier version of the extended, more carefully planned "drunk" acts that Chaplin did in features like "The Cure" and the excellent "One A.M."

The story is episodic, with the two stars as a couple of good-natured drunks who get into trouble with their wives and with plenty of others. Chaplin and Arbuckle could do that kind of material as well as anyone. Most of it is funny enough, although after a while it starts to run out of steam and seem a bit forced. There are a couple of good gags to go along with their drunk act, though other parts are fairly routine stuff. It's probably a little above average for its time, but it's not as imaginative as either Arbuckle's or Chaplin's best material.


13 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 16 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Instagram | Official Site

Country:

USA

Language:

None | English

Release Date:

7 September 1914 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Going Down See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Keystone Film Company See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TCM print) | (theatrical) | (video)

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed